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Administrative Law & Regulation

Alabama Department of Revenue v. CSX Transportation - Post-Argument SCOTUScast

SCOTUScast 12-17-14 - featuring Andy Grewal
Andy Grewal December 17, 2014

On December 9, 2014, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Alabama Department of Revenue v. CSX Transportation. The question presented in the case is twofold: (1) whether a state violates the Railroad Revitalization and Regulatory Reform Act of 1976 (4-R Act) by “discriminating against a rail carrier” when it requires rail carriers to pay a sales-and-use tax but exempts railroads’ competitors from paying the same tax; and (2) whether, in resolving a claim of unlawful tax discrimination under the 4-R Act, a court should consider the state's broader tax system rather than focusing only on the challenged tax provision.

To discuss the case, we have Andy Grewal, who is an Associate Professor of Law at the University of Iowa College of Law.

Amtrak and the Non-Delegation Doctrine in the Supreme Court - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
C. Frederick Beckner December 10, 2014

Congress passed the Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act (PRIIA) in 2008. Section 207 of PRIIA requires the Federal Railroad Administration and Amtrak to “jointly develop” the metrics and standards for Amtrak’s performance that are used by the Surface Transportation Board to trigger the investigation of private freight railroads for failing to provide preferences for Amtrak passenger trains (as required by federal law) if Amtrak fails to meet the standards. Is PRIIA Section 207 an unconstitutional delegation of legislative power to a private entity? The D.C. Circuit said yes, concluding that the statute is the functional equivalent of granting General Motors the authority to write regulations covering its industry rivals. Will the Supreme Court agree and breathe life into the rarely invoked non-delegation doctrine? Our expert attended the oral argument on Monday, December 8, and offered his impressions to a Teleforum audience.

  • C. Frederick Beckner, III, Partner, Sidley Austin LLP

Amtrak and the Resurgence of the Non-Delegation Doctrine? - Podcast

Administrative Law & Regulation Practice Group Podcast
Ronald A. Cass, Michael E. Herz, Brian Callanan December 05, 2014

Congress passed the Passenger Rail Investment and Improvement Act (PRIIA) in 2008. Section 207 of PRIIA requires the Federal Railroad Administration and Amtrak to “jointly develop” the metrics and standards for Amtrak’s performance that are used by the Surface Transportation Board to trigger the investigation of private freight railroads for failing to provide preferences for Amtrak passenger trains (as required by federal law) if Amtrak fails to meet the standards. Is PRIIA Section 207 an unconstitutional delegation of legislative power to a private entity? The D.C. Circuit said yes, concluding that the statute is the functional equivalent of granting General Motors the authority to write regulations covering its industry rivals. The Supreme Court will have a chance to consider the question in Department of Transportation v. Association of American Railroads, scheduled to be heard on December 8, 2014. Our experts discussed the case and previewed the oral arguments.

  • Hon. Ronald A. Cass, Dean Emeritus, Boston University School of Law and President, Cass & Associates, PC
  • Prof. Michael E. Herz, Arthur Kaplan Professor of Law, Co-Director, Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
  • Moderator: Brian Callanan, Associate, King & Spalding

Saving Congress from Itself: Emancipating the states & Empowering Their People - Event Video

2014 National Lawyers Convention
James L. Buckley, John C. Eastman, Michael S. Greve, Robert R. Gasaway November 17, 2014

Saving Congress from Itself proposes a single reform: eliminate all federal grants-in-aid to state and local governments. This action would reduce federal spending by over $600 billion a year and have a profound effect on how we govern ourselves. The proliferation of federal grants-in-aid programs is of recent vintage: only about 100 such grants existed before Lyndon Johnson took office, and now they number more than 1,100. Eliminating grants to the states will result in enormous savings in federal and state administrative costs; free states to set their own priorities; and improve the design and implementation of programs now subsidized by Washington by eliminating federal regulations that attend the grants. In short, it will free states and their subdivisions to resume full responsibility for all activities that fall within their competence, such as education, welfare, and highway construction and maintenance. And because members of Congress spend major portions of their time creating grants and allocating funds assigned to them (think earmarks), eliminating grants will enable Congress to devote its time to responsibilities that are uniquely national in character.

The Federalist Society's Practice Groups presented this closing discussion on "Saving Congress from Itself: Emancipating the States & Empowering Their People" on Saturday, November 15, during the 2014 National Lawyers Convention.

Featuring:

  • Hon. James L. Buckley, U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit (ret.) and former U.S. Senator
  • Dr. John C. Eastman, Henry Salvatori Professor of Law and Community Service; Former Dean (2007 – 2010); and Director, Center for Constitutional Jurisprudence, Dale E Fowler School of Law, Chapman University
  • Prof. Michael S. Greve, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law
  • Moderator: Mr. Robert R. Gasaway, Partner, Kirkland & Ellis LLP

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