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Civil Procedure

Compensation for the Wrongfully Imprisoned?

Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Teleforum Friday, July 07, 02:00 PMFederalist Society Teleforum Conference Call

In recent years, there have been a growing number of instances where people have been freed from prison after it was discovered they were actually not guilty of the crimes for which they were convicted. Most states provide little or no compensation to such exonerated individuals. Some advocacy groups are pushing for changes. What, if anything, should be done? What kind of compensation are the wrongfully imprisoned entitled to? What kind of financial obligations for these cases can state treasuries bear? What is the perspective of law enforcement on these questions? This Teleforum will explore these and related issues.

Featuring:

  • Ilya Somin, Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University
  • David LaBahn, President and CEO, Association of Prosecuting Attorneys

Courthouse Steps: BNSF Railway Co. v. Tyrrell - Podcast

Federalism & Separation of Powers Practice Group Podcast
Karen Harned June 07, 2017

In 2014, the Supreme Court unanimously held in Daimler AG v Bauman that, as a general matter, companies could only be sued in the state in which they are headquartered and incorporated or the plaintiff is injured. Nonetheless, the Supreme Court in BNSF Railways Co. v. Tyrell was asked to define, once again, when a company has a substantial and continuous enough presence in a state to provide “general jurisdiction.” In BNSF, plaintiffs brought suit in Montana state court although neither were injured in that state and BNSF is headquartered in Texas.  On May 30, the Supreme Court, in an 8-1 decision issued by Justice Ginsburg reaffirmed its holding in Daimler. In BNSF, it found that -- barring an exceptional case -- companies may only be sued where they are headquartered/incorporated or the plaintiff is injured. Karen Harned discussed the BNSF opinion and its impact on business and the plaintiff’s bar.

Featuring:

  • Karen Harned, Executive Director, National Federation of Independent Business Small Business Legal Center

Update: In re Fosamax (Alendronate Sodium) Products Liability Litigation - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Jay Lefkowitz, Douglas G. Smith May 25, 2017

In a recent decision, the Third Circuit held that hundreds of state-law claims alleging that bone fractures were caused by an osteoporosis medication were not preempted by federal law. While defendants argued, and the district court agreed, that the record showed that the FDA would not have approved stronger warnings in the product labeling, the Third Circuit concluded that the record raised factual issues that should go to a jury. In doing so, the court rejected defendants’ contention that preemption was a purely legal issue for the court to decide and suggested that the evidence must show that there was a “high probability” that the FDA would have rejected stronger labeling in order to invoke preemption. Was the appellate court correct? How does its decision fit with other recent preemption cases? Jay Lefkowitz and Doug Smith joined us to discuss these and other issues relating to the court’s decision.

Featuring:

  • Jay P. Lefkowitz, P.C., Partner, Kirkland & Ellis LLP
  • Douglas G. Smith, P.C., Partner, Kirkland & Ellis LLP

Spokeo v. Robins: One Year Later - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Jeffrey S. Jacobson, Alan C. Raul May 18, 2017

When is an alleged injury “concrete and particularized” under Article III of the U.S. Constitution? Spokeo, a self-proclaimed “online people search” site, was sued by Thomas Robins for publishing false information about him, which he claimed damaged his employment prospects. After being dismissed by the District Court and the Ninth Circuit for failing to state an injury “in fact,” the case was appealed to the Supreme Court where, one year ago, a 6-2 decision saw the Court vacate and remand the case. Legal experts Jeffrey Jacobson and Alan Raul joined us as we discussed the lasting implications of this decision on its first anniversary.   

Featuring: 

  • Jeffrey S. Jacobson, Partner, Kelley Drye & Warren LLP
  • Alan Charles Raul, Partner, Sidley Austin LLP

"Deep Pocket Jurisprudenceā„¢" and Meaningful Civil Justice Reform - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Victor E. Schwartz March 28, 2017

This Teleforum discussed what Victor Schwartz has labelled "Deep-Pocket Jurisprudence™." According to Mr. Schwartz, this occurs when state appellate courts expand tort law to include an innocent defendant because the wrongdoer is "judgment proof" or cannot be reached by the judicial process. The Supreme Court of Iowa has used the term and condemned the practice.

This call focused on the possible enactment of federal civil justice reform. On March 9 and 10th 2017 the House of Representatives passed three federal civil justice reform measures, namely the H.R. 720, Lawsuit Abuse Reduction Act, H.R. 725, Innocent Party Protection Act and H.R.925, the Fairness in Class Litigation Act. Each enjoy strong support from Speaker Paul Ryan and this marks the earliest in a congressional term that such federal civil justice reform measures have passed the House. Nevertheless, it remains to be seen whether they will pass through the Senate and be approved by President Trump.

Featuring:

  • Victor E. Schwartz, Partner, Shook, Hardy & Bacon LLP