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Class Action

“I Object!”: Class Action Lawsuit Settlements - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Jonathan R. Macey, Gerald Walpin April 01, 2015

Are shareholder lawsuits, filed in opposition to proposed corporate mergers or asset acquisitions, on the rise and, even if so, does that indicate a problem? Does the fact that most such lawsuits are quickly settled indicate they have underlying merit? Who are the winners and losers in such lawsuits, and are the interest of shareholders generally served by such lawsuits? How are attorney’s fees calculated? Assuming something is amiss, is there a remedy? Is the opportunity for intervention by an objector useful?

  • Prof. Jonathan R. Macey, Sam Harris Professor of Corporate Law, Corporate Finance, and Securities Law, Yale Law School
  • Hon. Gerald Walpin, former Inspector General, Corporation for National and Community Service, former Chief of Prosecutions, Office of the United States Attorney, Southern District of New York

Young Legal Scholars Paper Presentations - Event Audio/Video

17th Annual Faculty Conference
William Baude, Charles Korsmo, Minor Myers, Christopher Newman, Christopher J. Walker, Kevin Walsh, James Lindgren, Keith N. Hylton, Richard W. Garnett January 09, 2015

This panel was part of the 17th Annual Federalist Society Faculty Conference held on January 3-4, 2015 at the Omni Shoreham Hotel in Washington, DC.

Young Legal Scholars Paper Presentations
2:30-4:30 pm
In Memory of Prof. Dan Markel, Florida State University School of Law, Prawfsblawg Founder, and former Searle fellow

  • Prof. William Baude, University of Chicago Law School, "Is Originalism the Law?"
  • Prof. Charles Korsmo, Case Western University School of Law, "Aggregation by Acquisition: Replacing Class Actions with a Market for Legal Claims"
  • Prof. Minor Myers, Brooklyn Law School, "Aggregation by Acquisition: Replacing Class Actions with a Market for Legal Claims"
  • Prof. Christopher Newman, George Mason University School of Law, "Bailment and the Property/Contract Interface"
  • Prof. Christopher Walker, Ohio State University Moritz College of Law, "Inside Agency Interpretation"
  • Prof. Kevin Walsh, University of Richmond School of Law, "In the Beginning There Was None: Supreme Court Review of State Criminal Prosecutions"
  • Commentor: Prof. James Lindgren, Northwestern University School of Law
  • Commentor: Prof. Keith Hylton, Boston University School of Law
  • Moderator: Prof. Richard Garnett, University of Notre Dame Law School

Washington, DC
January 3, 2015

Telephone Consumer Protection Act Reform - Podcast

Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group Podcast
Scott D. Delacourt, Jason D. Goldman December 17, 2014

Congress adopted the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (“TCPA”) to protect consumers from aggressive telemarketing and to bolster the “right to be left alone.” But more than 20 years after its adoption, the statute has given rise to an explosion of class action lawsuits, raising questions about whether the law is continuing to serve its intended purpose. Defendants have sought relief from the implementing agency, the Federal Communications Commission, and some relief has been forthcoming. However, the rate at which lawsuits have proliferated has far outstripped the pace of regulatory relief. Our experts discussed whether fundamental TCPA reform is needed and, if so, how it might be achieved.

  • Scott D. Delacourt, Partner, Wiley Rein LLP
  • Jason D. Goldman, Senior Telecommunications Policy Counsel, Managing Director, Environment, Technology & Regulatory Affairs Division, U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Supreme Court Cert Alert: Obamacare Case Granted, BP Case Pending - Podcast

Practice Groups Podcast
Jonathan H. Adler, John S. Baker, Jr. November 12, 2014

On Friday, November 7, the U.S. Supreme Court granted a petition for cert in King v. Burwell, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals case concerning the payment of subsidies to participants in federally-run versus state-run health care exchanges. Many believe a decision that cuts against the government's interpretation of the statute could undermine Obamacare. A temporary circuit split on the issue was obviated weeks ago when the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals agreed to en banc review of a three-judge panel decision that reached a result different than had the Fourth Circuit. Our experts discussed why the Court agreed to hear a case that upheld a federal government interpretation of a federal statute.

Meanwhile, LSU Law School Professor John Baker has written a paper (available here) discussing the administration of the settlement fund in the BP Horizon oil spill. In that matter, BP asserts that the fund administrator is awarding damages to plaintiffs who were not harmed by the oil spill, and BP seeks relief in the Court. Later the week of November 10, the Court is expected to consider a cert grant in this important case.

  • Prof. Jonathan H. Adler, Johan Verheij Memorial Professor of Law, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
  • Prof. John S. Baker, Jr., Visiting Professor, Georgetown University Law Center and Professor Emeritus, LSU Law School

Hot Topics in Class Action Reform: The BP Deepwater Horizon Case - Event Audio/Video

Sponsored by the Federalist Society's Practice Groups
Neal K. Katyal, Theodore B. Olson, Stuart S. Taylor September 09, 2014

Putting aside criminal cases, the stakes for all sides are perhaps never higher than in a class action case – mere certification of a class can increase the pressure to settle exponentially. But, of course, the class must be properly composed in order to be certified. In the recently-decided Wal-Mart v. Dukes case, the U.S. Supreme Court revisited some of the basic requirements for certification of a class of plaintiffs, including commonality. Other requirements of Rule 23 certification may surface in ongoing litigation stemming from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, where defense attorneys are arguing, among other things, that the settlement agreement is being administered and interpreted overly broadly to include numerous class members who have not suffered any injury caused by BP. Our experts will discuss recent developments in class action litigation, including a pending petition for cert in the BP case. The Federalist Society presented this panel on September 4, 2014.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Neal K. Katyal, Partner, Hogan Lovells, and Paul and Patricia Saunders Professor of National Security Law, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Hon. Theodore B. Olson, Partner, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP
  • Moderator: Mr. Stuart S. Taylor, Jr., Nonresident Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, The Brookings Institution

National Press Club
Washington, DC