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Commercial Litigation

In Re: Walgreen Co. Stockholder Litigation Update - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Theodore H. Frank February 24, 2017

According to the Competitive Enterprise Institute, over 97% of mergers and acquisitions result in "strike suits," litigation seeking to enjoin a merger that often quickly settles for attorneys' fees and supplemental disclosures to shareholders. In In Re: Walgreen Co. Stockholder Litigation, 832 F.3d 718, a recent case over such a settlement, Judge Richard Posner called the practice a "racket," and the Seventh Circuit rejected the lawsuit’s claims. Meanwhile, Delaware and New York courts have come out on opposite sides of the issue.

Ted Frank of the Competitive Enterprise Institute, who successfully argued Walgreen and has multiple appeals on the subject pending in other jurisdictions, discussed developments in the area over the last year and answer questions.

Featuring:

  • Theodore H. Frank, Senior Attorney & Director, Center for Class Action Fairness (CCAF), CEI

Class Action in Consumer Finance Agreements - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Jason Johnston, Thaddeus King July 27, 2016

The Federal Arbitration Act (FAA), passed in 1925, generally requires courts to look favorably upon all arbitration agreements. In 2011, the Supreme Court upheld an arbitration agreement in a contract for mobile phone services that contained a class action ban. The court ruled that a state law that prevented the class action ban from being enforced was “an obstacle to the accomplishment of the FAA’s objectives.”

However, Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Act in 2010, which authorizes the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to study arbitration agreements in consumer contracts and limit or prohibit them if doing so would be in the public interest and for the protection of consumers. In May 2016, the CFPB issued a proposed rule that would ban arbitration agreements that acted to prevent class action lawsuits and would further establish certain reporting requirements for other arbitrations that are filed between consumers and providers.

Our experts discussed this proposed rule, including the history that led us to this point and the potential impact it will have if it is finalized.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Jason Johnston, Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law 
  • Thaddeus King, Officer, Consumer Banking,The Pew Charitable Trusts

The Future of Arbitration Agreements after the CFPB Study - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Teleforum
Deepak Gupta, Andrew J. Pincus July 17, 2015

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 instructs the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to study “the use of agreements providing for arbitration of any future dispute . . . in connection with the offering or providing of consumer financial products or services,” and to provide a report to Congress on the same topic.  This past March, the CFPB issued its study, pursuant to the statutory requirement.  Is the “arbitration study” an anti-arbitration study?  Our experts discussed the report and its implications.

  • Mr. Deepak Gupta, Founding Principal, Gupta Wessler PLLC
  • Mr. Andrew J. Pincus, Partner, Mayer Brown LLP

Should a royalty agreement exceed the life of a patent?

Short video featuring Greg Dolin
Gregory Dolin May 12, 2015

Professor Greg Dolin of the University of Baltimore School of Law discusses the dispute in Kimble v. Marvel, a case argued before the Supreme Court in March.  Petitioner Kimble invented and patented a toy.  Respondent Marvel contractually agreed to pay royalties on that patent that included a period of time after the expiration of the patent.  The Court is being asked to overrule a precedent dating back to 1964 which held such agreements to be unlawful per se.  

As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

“I Object!”: Class Action Lawsuit Settlements - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Jonathan R. Macey, Gerald Walpin April 01, 2015

Are shareholder lawsuits, filed in opposition to proposed corporate mergers or asset acquisitions, on the rise and, even if so, does that indicate a problem? Does the fact that most such lawsuits are quickly settled indicate they have underlying merit? Who are the winners and losers in such lawsuits, and are the interest of shareholders generally served by such lawsuits? How are attorney’s fees calculated? Assuming something is amiss, is there a remedy? Is the opportunity for intervention by an objector useful?

  • Prof. Jonathan R. Macey, Sam Harris Professor of Corporate Law, Corporate Finance, and Securities Law, Yale Law School
  • Hon. Gerald Walpin, former Inspector General, Corporation for National and Community Service, former Chief of Prosecutions, Office of the United States Attorney, Southern District of New York