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Drug Legislation and Enforcement

The Opioid Epidemic: Problem and Prescription - Podcast

Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Podcast
Shane Dana, Drew Hudson, James Baehr July 27, 2016

Over 75 Americans die every day of an opioid overdose (both prescription drug opioids and heroin), a number that has quadrupled since 1999. Meanwhile, the amount of prescription drug opioids (oxycodone, hydrocodone and their ilk) sold in the United States has grown fourfold during the same period.

Our experts explored the scope of this growing problem, and the proposed legislative solution, the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act signed into law by President Obama on July 22, 2016.

Featuring:

  • Shane Dana, Federal Bureau of Investigation; Case Agent, Chasing the Dragon Project
  • Drew Hudson, Legislative Counsel, United States Senate Judiciary Committee
  • Moderator: James Baehr, Assistant United States Attorney, Eastern District of Louisiana

Ferguson, Baltimore, and Criminal Justice Reform - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Lawyers Convention
Arthur Loevy, Tim Lynch, David B. Muhlhausen, Michael P. Tremoglie, Robert L. Woodson, David Stras, Gail Heriot November 18, 2015

Criminal justice and policing reform are much in the news lately, sparked by events that garner national media coverage. This panel will assess the need for reform, and the road forward. How do media narratives about policing square with the empirical evidence? What are the most effective methods of policing, and how can they best be promoted? What is the proper way to balance police activity and the crime rate? In the current atmosphere, is legitimate police activity chilled? Must law enforcement officers responding to calls pause to consider their potential personal liability?

Civil Rights: Ferguson, Baltimore, and Criminal Justice Reform
12:00 noon – 2:15 p.m.
East Room

  • Mr. Arthur Loevy, Partner, Loevy & Loevy
  • Mr. Tim Lynch, Director, Project on Criminal Justice, The Cato Institute
  • Dr. David B. Muhlhausen, Research Fellow in Empirical Policy Analysis,  Center for Data Analysis, The Heritage Foundation
  • Mr. Michael P. Tremoglie, Former Philadelphia Police Officer
  • Mr. Robert L. Woodson, Sr., Founder and President, Center for Neighborhood Enterprise
  • Moderator: Hon. David Stras, Associate Justice, Supreme Court of Minnesota
  • Introduction: Hon. Gail Heriot, Professor of Law, University of San Diego School of Law

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC

Federal Monitoring of Local Policing - Podcast

Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Podcast
William G. Otis, Samuel Walker September 26, 2014

Is it within a federal court's authority to order local police officers to wear video cameras in an effort to create an "objective record" of police activity, as occurred last summer in New York City? What is the basis and is it advisable for the Department of Justice to impose reforms on local police activity via consent decrees or other means (see here and here)? What should we make of lawsuits, such as the one filed by police officers rejecting such oversight in Seattle? Are they attempts to vindicate the sovereignty of their own policing, or do they gloss over the serious problems in law enforcement that would go otherwise unchecked without federal involvement? Our experts answered these and other questions.

  • Prof. William G. Otis, Adjunct Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Prof. Samuel Walker, Emeritus Professor of Criminal Justice, University of Nebraska at Omaha

Controversial Sentencing in the Antwuan Ball Case - Podcast

Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Podcast
Douglas Berman, Paul G. Cassell April 18, 2014

prison bars

In 2005, Washington, D.C. resident Antwuan Ball was indicted for a massive drug conspiracy and associated murders. Following a lengthy jury trial he was acquitted on all the counts, except for one crack distribution count. At sentencing, District Judge Richard Roberts found “clear evidence of [Ball's leadership in] a drug conspiracy” and sentenced Ball to a 225-month prison sentence for the drug distribution — far in excess of the recommended guideline sentence for the single drug distribution charge. The D.C. Circuit upheld this sentence in a decision on March 14. Was the D.C. Circuit Court correct? Our experts discussed the opinion and answered questions from our call-in audience.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Douglas Berman, Robert J. Watkins/Procter & Gamble Professor of Law, The Ohio State University Moritz College of Law
  • Hon. Paul G. Cassell, Ronald N. Boyce Presidential Endowed Chair in Criminal Law, The University of Utah College of Law

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