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Employment Law

The Minimum Wage - Event Video

2014 National Lawyers Convention
Ross Eisenbrey, Diana Furchtgott-Roth, Karen Harned, David Weil, William Kuntz November 14, 2014

In January 2014, in his State of the Union Address, President Obama called on Congress to raise the national minimum wage to $10.10 an hour.  In February, President Obama used his pen to raise the minimum wage for employees working on government contracts to $10.10 through an Executive Order.  This panel will explore the policy and economics of increasing the minimum wage, which the White House asserts will lift wages for millions of Americans and boost the bottom lines of businesses.

The Federalist Society's Labor & Employment Law Practice Group presented this panel on "The Minimum Wage" on Thursday, November 13, during the 2014 National Lawyers Convention.

Featuring:

  • Mr. Ross Eisenbrey, Vice President, Economic Policy Institute and former Member, U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission
  • Ms. Diana Furchtgott-Roth, Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute for Policy Research, former chief economist, U.S. Department of Labor
  • Mrs. Karen R. Harned, Executive Director, National Federation of Independent Business Small Business Legal Foundation
  • Hon. David Weil, Administrator, Wage and Hour Division, U.S. Department of Labor
  • Moderator: Hon. William F. Kuntz, II, United States District Court, Eastern District of New York

Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC

Showcase Panel I: Youth, Employment, and the Law - Event Video

2014 National Lawyers Convention
Richard A. Epstein, Chai Feldblum, Gail Heriot, J.H. "Rip" Verkerke, Jennifer Walker Elrod November 14, 2014

This panel will examine intergenerational equity issues raised by employment discrimination laws, including those protecting the elderly from discrimination.  Those laws, minimum wage laws, laws favoring unionization, and laws countering arbitrary dismissal have obvious appeal.  But many of those very laws greatly raise the costs to business of entry-level hiring.  One consequence may be that many young people are only able to enter the work force as interns or fellows.  This may be especially true for minorities.  Are these costs worth the benefits?  Is there some middle ground?

The Federalist Society's Practice Groups presented this showcase panel on "Youth, Employment and the Law" on Thursday, November 13, during the 2014 National Lawyers Convention.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Richard A. Epstein, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law, New York University School of Law, and James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law, University of Chicago Law School
  • Hon. Chai Rachel Feldblum, U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission
  • Hon. Gail Heriot, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, and Professor, University of San Diego School of Law
  • Prof. J. Hoult "Rip" Verkerke, Director, Program for Employment and Labor Law Studies, University of Virginia School of Law
  • Moderator: Hon. Jennifer W. Elrod, U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC

Right to Work in the Midwest - Podcast

Labor & Employment Law Practice Group Podcast
Milton L. Chappell October 30, 2014

In 2012 and 2013, Indiana and Michigan, respectively, passed Right to Work laws covering both public and private sector employees. Wisconsin (2012) passed Act 10, which created Right to Work protections for most public employees and limited many aspects of public sector bargaining.

In response to this legislation, unions and their supporters in each of these states filed numerous state and federal lawsuits, challenging these laws on a wide variety of federal and state constitutional grounds. Some of the cases have been decided and others remain pending. The Wisconsin Supreme Court recently turned down a major challenge to Act 10, the Indiana Supreme Court recently heard oral argument on one state constitutional challenge, and the Michigan Supreme Court is slated to hear oral argument soon on a challenge brought by civil service unions. In addition, employees seeking to resign their memberships or cut off dues deductions have filed numerous actions in state courts and administrative agencies to enforce the laws in the face of union policies designed to restrict resignations and dues revocations. The current status of the three states’ laws and the many court challenges will be discussed in this Teleforum.

  • Milton L. Chappell, Staff Attorney, National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation