MENU

Energy

Newly Proposed CO2 Rules - Podcast

Environmental Law & Property Rights Practice Group Podcast
David B. Rivkin, Jr., Mark DeLaquil June 06, 2014

power plantIn an effort to address air pollution and global warming, on June 2, 2014, the Obama Administration took action that would require a 30 percent cut in carbon emissions at fossil fuel-burning power plants by 2030. How must such reductions be accomplished? How much latitude will states and private actors have in meeting the new requirements? What is the process for finalizing the administration’s proposal? Our experts addressed these and other questions.

  • Mark W. DeLaquil, Partner, Baker & Hostetler LLP
  • David B. Rivkin, Jr., Partner, Baker & Hostetler LLP

Energy and the Executive: Yucca Mountain and the Separation of Powers - Podcast

Environmental Law & Property Rights Practice Group Podcast
Adam J. White, Dean A. Reuter August 28, 2013

Energy and the Executive: Yucca Mountain and the Separation of Powers - PodcastThe effort to build the Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository has been a decades-long political struggle. On August 13th, 2013, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals issued an opinion ordering the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to re-start the legally-mandated licensing process and continue reviewing a Department of Energy application for the waste repository. Our expert told the story of Yucca’s history and analyze the decision and its implications.

Featuring:

  • Adam J. WhiteCounsel, Boyden Gray & Associates
  • Moderator: Mr. Dean A. Reuter, Vice President & Director of Practice Groups, The Federalist Society

[Listen now!]

Obama Administration Policy on Offshore Oil and Gas Production: Consensus or Contempt?

Engage Volume 14, Issue 1 February 2013
Roger J. Marzulla April 04, 2013

Obama Administration Policy on Offshore Oil and Gas Production: Consensus or Contempt?In March 2010, President Obama announced his support for expanded oil and gas production in the Arctic and the Gulf of Mexico.1 But on April 20, 2010, explosions and fires destroyed the Mobile Offshore Drilling Rig Deepwater Horizon approximately 50 miles from the Mississippi River Delta, killed eleven people aboard the rig, and injured many others. Millions of barrels of oil flowed into the Gulf of Mexico from the damaged well for months, until the well was finally sealed on September 19, 2010....[Read More!]

The EPA's Anticipated Attempt to Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Existing Power Plants - Podcast

Environmental Law & Property Rights Practice Group Podcast
Mark DeLaquil, William J. Haun, Dean A. Reuter March 25, 2013

The EPA's Anticipated Attempt to Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Existing Power Plants - PodcastFor roughly two decades, the bipartisan consensus of the U.S. Congress on the regulation of greenhouse gases from non-mobile sources has been that it’s best to let sleeping dogs lie. Critics of any attempted regulation have cited a variety of prudential and legal problems that would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from using the Clean Air Act—the awkward basis for current greenhouse gas regulation—to regulate emissions standards from “stationary sources” of energy. Nevertheless, President Obama has asserted that the needs in this area are great, that “Americans cannot resist this transition,” and the EPA is thus expected to propose such regulations. Can the CAA, previously limited to existing-source emissions of relatively rare substances, be read to now authorize the regulation of greenhouse gases from non-mobile sources? This podcast is a recording of a previously held conference call and has not been edited for sound quality.

Featuring:

  • Mr. Mark W. DeLaquil, Partner, Baker & Hostetler LLP
  • Mr. William J. Haun, Federal Law Clerk
  • Moderator: Mr. Dean A. Reuter, Vice President & Director of Practice Groups, The Federalist Society

[Listen now!]

The Clean Air Act as an Obstacle to the Environmental Protection Agency’s Anticipated Attempt to Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Existing Power Plants

Federalist Society White Paper
William J. Haun March 11, 2013

The Clean Air Act as an Obstacle to the Environmental Protection Agency’s Anticipated Attempt to Regulate Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Existing Power PlantsFor roughly two decades, the bipartisan consensus of the U.S. Congress on the regulation of greenhouse gases from non-mobile sources has been that it's best to let sleeping dogs lie. Critics of any attempted regulation have cited a variety of prudential and legal problems that would prevent the Environmental Protection Agency from using the Clean Air Act (CAA)--the awkward basis for current greenhouse gas regulation--to regulate emissions standards from "stationary sources" of energy. Nevertheless, President Obama has asserted that the needs in this area are great, that "Americans cannot resist this transition," and the EPA is thus expected to propose such regulations.  Can the CAA, previously limited to existing-source emissions of relatively rare substances, be read to now authorize the regulation of greenhouse gases from non-mobile sources?...[Read Now!]