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Financial Institutions

The Constitutionality of Independent Agencies: The CFPB - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Peter Conti-Brown, Gregory F. Jacob August 25, 2016

In April, the mortgage lender PHH Corporation challenged the constitutionality of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) after being ordered by the CFPB to disgorge $109 million. PHH challenged the bureau’s legitimacy under Article II, and cited Free Enterprise Fund v. Public Company Accounting Oversight Board as relevant precedent, because PCA officers could be removed for cause, and then, only by officers of the SEC. Meanwhile, the CFPB cited Humphrey’s Executor v. United States, in which the Supreme Court upheld the constitutionality of the Federal Trade Commission Act, which allowed the president to remove an FTC commissioner only for cause. Professor Peter Conti-Brown of The Wharton School and Gregory Jacob, partner at O'Melveny & Myers LLP joined us to discuss the CFPB and the constitutionality of other independent agencies like it.

Featuring:

  • Mr. Peter Conti-Brown, Assistant Professor of Legal Studies and Business Ethics, The Wharton School
  • Mr. Gregory F. Jacob, Gregory F. Jacob Partner, O'Melveny & Myers LLP

Class Action in Consumer Finance Agreements - Podcast

Litigation Practice Group Podcast
Jason Johnston, Thaddeus King July 27, 2016

The Federal Arbitration Act (FAA), passed in 1925, generally requires courts to look favorably upon all arbitration agreements. In 2011, the Supreme Court upheld an arbitration agreement in a contract for mobile phone services that contained a class action ban. The court ruled that a state law that prevented the class action ban from being enforced was “an obstacle to the accomplishment of the FAA’s objectives.”

However, Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Act in 2010, which authorizes the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) to study arbitration agreements in consumer contracts and limit or prohibit them if doing so would be in the public interest and for the protection of consumers. In May 2016, the CFPB issued a proposed rule that would ban arbitration agreements that acted to prevent class action lawsuits and would further establish certain reporting requirements for other arbitrations that are filed between consumers and providers.

Our experts discussed this proposed rule, including the history that led us to this point and the potential impact it will have if it is finalized.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Jason Johnston, Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation Professor of Law, University of Virginia School of Law 
  • Thaddeus King, Officer, Consumer Banking,The Pew Charitable Trusts

The Department of Labor’s Fiduciary Rulemaking: Impacts, Implications and Related Policy Issues - Podcast

Financial Services & E-Commerce Practice Group Podcast
Jeffrey T. Dinwoodie, Annette L. Nazareth May 10, 2016

On April 6, 2016, the Department of Labor released its much-anticipated “fiduciary” rulemaking, which will greatly expand the universe of entities and persons who will be deemed fiduciaries with respect to retirement plans and accounts. The rulemaking has garnered significant interest from members of Congress, federal and state regulators, FINRA, the financial services industry and investor advocates, among others. Our experts discussed the new rules, and their history and purpose. They also explored several of the key policy issues and controversies associated with the rulemaking.

Featuring:

  • Jeffrey T. Dinwoodie, Associate, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP
  • Hon. Annette L. Nazareth, Partner, Davis Polk & Wardwell LLP

Is the Administrative State Too Big to Fail?: MetLife v. Financial Stability Oversight Council - Podcast

Financial Services & E-Commerce Practice Group Podcast
Peter J. Wallison April 26, 2016

On March 30, Federal district court Judge Rosemary Collyer struck down the Financial Stability Oversight Council’s designation of MetLife as a systemically important financial institution. MetLife v. Financial Stability Oversight Council has readily apparent implications for financial regulation, and many commentators have suggested that it may even have far-reaching effects on the future of the larger administrative state. Our expert discussed the opinion, its outlook on appeal, and its possible impact.

Featuring:

  • Hon. Peter J. Wallison, Arthur F. Burns Fellow in Financial Policy Studies, American Enterprise Institute

Explaining the Next Crisis - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Lawyers Convention
Phil Gramm, Frank Medina, Karen Shaw Petrou, J.W. Verret, Edith H. Jones November 18, 2015

Many observers of the U.S. financial system increasingly believe that the United States will soon experience another financial crisis – the only questions are when and how bad will it be? With that expectation in mind, the panel could address the following issues: What are the likely early indicators that another crisis is in the offing? What economic conditions are the likely causes of that crisis (rising housing prices, the reemgence of shadow banking, other consequences of Dodd-Frank, crises emanating from other countries, etc.)? What might ignite that crisis? Who will likely be blamed for causing the next crisis and who or what should be blamed? What might be the political/legislative response(s) to the next crisis? What, if anything, can be done to mitigate the consequences of the next financial crisis and possibly even steer the U.S. economy away from future financial crises?

Financial Services: Explaining the Next Crisis
12:00 noon – 2:15 p.m.
Chinese Room

  • Hon. Phil Gramm, Senior Advisor, US Policy Metrics and Former United States Senator
  • Mr. Frank Medina, Senior Counsel & Director of Research, Better Markets
  • Ms. Karen Shaw Petrou, Managing Partner, Federal Financial Analytics, Inc.
  • Prof. J.W. Verret, Assistant Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law
  • Moderator: Hon. Edith H. Jones, U.S. Court of Appeals, Fifth Circuit

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC