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History of Law

The Constitution: An Introduction - Podcast

Federalism & Separation of Powers Practice Group Podcast
Michael S. Paulsen, Kevin Walsh May 07, 2015

In their new book, The Constitution: An Introduction, constitutional scholar Michael Stokes Paulsen and his son, Luke Paulsen, write a lively modern primer on the U.S. Constitution. Beginning with the Constitution’s birth in 1787, Paulsen and Paulsen offer a tour of its provisions, principles, and interpretation, introducing readers to the characters and controversies that have shaped the Constitution in the 200-plus years since its creation. In a review published in Engage, the Law Journal of the Federalist Society, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito praises the book’s unique format: “Professor Paulsen and his son began this collaboration when Luke was in high school and continued throughout his college years at Princeton. It is easy to imagine this process as a conversation between a father, who has been immersed in the study of the Constitution for his entire adult life, and a bright son, who brings a new perspective and challenges the father to explain and defend.” Justice Alito goes on to say that the book “invites readers to become personally engaged in the discussion of the Constitution that began in the fall of 1787 when the citizens of the states debated ratification.” In this spirit of debate, both of the authors joined University of Richmond School of Law Professor Kevin Walsh and answered audience questions on a Teleforum conference call.

  • Luke Paulsen, Co-author, The Constitution: An Introduction
  • Prof. Michael S. Paulsen, Co-author, The Constitution: An Introduction, Distinguished University Chair and Professor, University of St. Thomas School of Law
  • Prof. Kevin C. Walsh, University of Richmond School of Law

Our Lost Constitution: The Willful Subversion of America's Founding Document - Podcast

Federalism & Separation of Powers Practice Group Podcast
Michael S. Lee April 22, 2015

The still-unfolding story of America’s Constitution is a history of heroes and villains—the flawed visionaries who inspired and crafted liberty’s safeguards, and the shortsighted opportunists who defied them. Those stories are known by few today.

In Our Lost Constitution, Senator Mike Lee tells the dramatic, little-known stories behind six of the Constitution’s most indispensable provisions. He shows their rise. He shows their fall. And he makes vividly clear how nearly every abuse of federal power today is rooted in neglect of this Lost Constitution. Senator Mike Lee joined a Teleforum conference call for a special discussion with Federalist Society members regarding his new book.

  • Hon. Michael S. Lee, United States Senate

2014 National Lawyers Convention Opening with Justice Scalia - Event Video

2014 National Lawyers Convention
Antonin Scalia, Leonard A. Leo November 13, 2014

United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia opened the 2014 National Lawyers Convention on November 13 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC. Justice Scalia discussed the importance of Magna Carta.

Featuring:

  • Hon. Antonin Scalia, United States Supreme Court
  • Introduction: Mr. Leonard A. Leo, Executive Vice President, The Federalist Society

Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC

Originalism and the Good Constitution - Podcast

Federalism & Separation of Powers Practice Group Podcast
Michael B. Rappaport, John O. McGinnis, Michael S. Greve March 19, 2014

Originalism and the Good Constitution

Originalism holds that the U.S. Constitution should be interpreted according to its meaning at the time it was enacted. In their innovative defense of originalism, John McGinnis and Michael Rappaport maintain that the text of the Constitution should be adhered to by the Supreme Court because it was enacted by supermajorities — both its original enactment under Article VII and subsequent Amendments under Article V. A text approved by supermajorities has special value in a democracy because it has unusually wide support and thus tends to maximize the welfare of the greatest number.

The authors recognize and respond to many possible objections. Does originalism perpetuate the dead hand of the past? How can following the original meaning be justified, given that African Americans and women were excluded from the enactment of the Constitution in 1787 and many of its subsequent Amendments? What is originalism’s place in interpretation of the Constitution, when after two hundred years there is so much non-originalist precedent?

A fascinating counterfactual they pose is this: had the Supreme Court not interpreted the Constitution so freely, perhaps the nation would have resorted to the Article V amendment process more often and with greater effect. The authors of Originalism and the Good Constitution, Prof. Michael B. Rappaport and Prof. John O. McGinnis, discussed the book along with commentary from Prof. Michael Greve on a live Teleforum conference call.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Michael S. Greve, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law
  • Prof. Michael B. Rappaport, Darling Foundation Professor of Law, University of San Diego School of Law
  • Prof. John O. McGinnis, George C. Dix Professor in Constitutional Law, Northwestern University School of Law

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