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International Human Rights Law

The Siege of Aleppo and War Crimes - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
Laurie R. Blank, Michael A. Newton December 02, 2016

For months, Syrian and Russian warplanes have bombed Aleppo, killing and wounding residents. Russian officials have referred to the siege as “diplomacy backed by force.”  The US Ambassador to the UN has called it “barbarism.”  The US and France have called for a War Crimes investigation, but any meaningful action at the UN has been blocked by Russia’s place on the Security Council.  In this Teleforum, two distinguished professors with extensive practical experience examined the status of the siege under the Law of Armed Conflict and International Humanitarian Law.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Laurie R. Blank, Clinical Professor of Law, Emory University School of Law
  • Michael A. Newton, Professor of the Practice of Law Director, Vanderbilt-in-Venice Program, Vanderbilt University Law School

 

We've Said It – Now What? Genocide in the Middle East - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
Julian Ku, Nina Shea, Gregory H. Stanton, Jeremy A. Rabkin April 12, 2016

After much prodding from human rights advocates and congressional committees, Secretary of State John Kerry announced that the Obama administration considers ISIS guilty of "genocide." Why did it take them so long? The Obama administration may believe the rationale that Christian purges are mitigated by the ISIS offer of historic jizya (dhimmi tax) compliance from religious objectors. But field reports reveal that, under ISIS, the jizya option has been categorically rejected. What does the genocide designation do for targeted religious groups? Does it matter that particular religious groups are described by this designation? Should we now expect a very different policy in the Middle East?

Featuring:

  • Prof. Julian Ku, Maurice A. Deane Distinguished Professor of Constitutional Law, Faculty Director of International Programs and Hofstra Research Fellow, Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University
  • Nina Shea, Director, Center for Religious Freedom, Hudson Institute
  • Dr. Gregory H. Stanton, President, Genocide Watch
  • Moderator: Prof. Jeremy Rabkin, Professor of Law, George Mason University School of Law

Developing The International Response To The Paris Attacks - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
François-Henri Briard, Michael Chertoff December 09, 2015

The attacks by ISIS on the citizens of Paris and the world have again focused attention on the challenges of counterterrorism. In this Teleforum, former U.S. Secretary of Homeland Security Michael Chertoff and prominent French lawyer Francois-Henri Briard addressed issues such as international cooperation on surveillance and intelligence sharing, whether policies on encryption of electronic communications need to be revised, what authorities or international institutions, if any, should be called upon in support of the use of force against ISIS, and the nature of the response from France, the U.S., Russia, and other nations.

Featuring:

  • Francois-Henri Briard, Supreme Court Attorney (France), Delaporte, Briard & Trichet 
  • Michael Chertoff, Executive Chairman and Co-Founder, The Chertoff Group

When Should America Act to Maintain International Order? - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Lawyers Convention
Colin Dueck, Benjamin H. Friedman, François-Henri Briard, Mike J. Rogers, Brian H. Hook November 18, 2015

Most would agree that the world is unsettled, with hotspots in the Middle East, North Korea, the South China Sea, and the Ukraine, to name but a few. Terrorism has complicated international relations. But exactly when, and how, should America act to maintain order? Is a muscular and expeditionary style of engagement to be favored over quiet diplomacy? Is more and faster better than less and slower? How contextual should the answers to these questions be?

International: When Should America Act to Maintain International Order?
3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Grand Ballroom

  • Prof. Colin Dueck, Associate Professor, George Mason University School of Policy, Government, and International Affairs
  • Mr. Benjamin H. Friedman, Research Fellow in Defense and Homeland Security Studies, Cato Institute
  • Mr. François-Henri Briard, Supreme Court Attorney (France), Delaporte, Briard & Trichet
  • Hon. Mike J. Rogers, Former U.S. House of Representatives, Michigan
  • Moderator: Mr. Brian H. Hook, former Assistant Secretary of State

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC

The Story Behind Iran's Assets - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
Michael Ledeen, David B. Rivkin, Jr. October 30, 2015

Iran is a highly stressed country, and an overwhelming majority of Iranians detest the regime, according to several polls and surveys (some by the regime). At the moment, thousands of teachers are protesting the arrest of seven leaders of their organization, women's protests are commonplace, and workers are on strike, having failed to be paid for several months.

From time to time the contempt of the people has erupted into open revolt, most notably in mid-summer, 2009. Yet no Western leader has supported them in any way. Since Western interests would be substantially advanced if Iran were a free country instead of a fanatical anti-Western theocratic dictatorship, is it time for the U.S. to support these people and openly work for democratic regime change in Iran?

Featuring:

  • Dr. Michael Ledeen, Freedom Scholar, Foundation for Defense of Democracies 
  • David B. Rivkin, Jr., Partner, Baker & Hostetler LLP