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International Law & Trade

The Future of Fintech Regulation - Podcast

Financial Services & E-Commerce Practice Group Podcast
Brian Knight, John W. Ryan, Wayne A. Abernathy August 07, 2017

Technology is having a significant impact on how financial services are being delivered. The rise of non-bank financial firms using the internet as a means of distribution is calling into question the divide between state and federal regulation and the definition of what a “bank” is. The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency has responded by offering a new banking charter for non-depository fintech firms, while the states have filed law suits to prevent what they see as an illegal overreach by the OCC into their jurisdiction. How fintech firms are regulated, and by whom, could have a significant impact on how innovative, accessible, and inclusive financial services are in the future.

Featuring: 

  • Brian Knight, Senior Research Fellow, Financial Markets Working Group, Mercatus Center, George Mason University
  • John W. Ryan, President and Chief Executive Officer, Conference of State Bank Supervisors
  • Moderator: Hon. Wayne A. Abernathy, Executive VP for Financial Institutions Policy and Regulatory Affairs, American Bankers Association

Global Politics of Internet Regulation: Actors and Trajectory - Podcast

Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group Podcast
Will Hudson, Patricia J. Paoletta, Sally Shipman Wentworth, Umair Javed July 26, 2017

In recent years, the United Nations’ International Telecommunication Union has become an arena where governments promote rival visions of the future of the organization and, more importantly, how the Internet itself should be governed.  These debates reflect a growing tension around a foundational question: to what extent can and should nation-states act to manage the flow of information within their sovereign territory?  As the Internet’s importance as a driver for global economic and social growth has grown over the past decade, so too has the interest of some governments to secure for themselves a larger role in regulating the technical, economic, and policy aspects of its management.  

Governments are driven by a range of objectives as they consider the future of the Internet, including access and uptake, competition policy, privacy and security, and, in some cases, regime stability.  Will it be possible to accommodate some governments’ desire for a more robust role and still maintain essential democratic principles such as the free flow of information between people around the world, universal human rights, and the core belief that has driven the Internet’s exponential growth over the past decade: that users, companies, and civil society – not governments – ought to control the Internet’s future?  What are the political, economic, and geopolitical factors driving Internet regulation and policies?  Umair Javed moderated a discussion with Will Hudson of Google, Sally Wentworth of the Internet Society, and Patricia Paoletta of Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis to explain recent activities at the UN to influence global Internet policy.

Featuring:

  • Will Hudson, Senior Advisor for International Policy, Google Inc.
  • Patricia J. Paoletta, Partner, Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis LLP
  • Sally Wentworth, Vice President of Global Policy Development, Internet Society
  • Moderator: Umair Javed, Associate, Wiley Rein LLP 

Immigration Moratorium Back in the Court - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
Josh Blackman, Ilya Somin July 25, 2017

Eighteen days after the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project and stay applications were granted in part, on July 14, 2017, Judge Watson of the District Court of Hawaii ruled that grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, and other relatives of people could not be prevented from entering the country as they qualified as persons with a “bona fide relationship” under the Supreme Court ruling.

On July 19, 2017, the Supreme Court upheld parts of the District Court order. Ilya Somin and Josh Blackman joined us again to discuss developments in the litigation of Executive Order 13780.

Featuring: 

  • Prof. Josh Blackman, Associate Professor of Law, South Texas College of Law, Houston
  • Prof. Ilya Somin, Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University

 

The Constitutional War Powers of the Executive and Legislative Branches - Event Audio/Video

Article I Initiative
Mickey Edwards, Andrew C. McCarthy, Nathan Kaczmarek July 13, 2017

What kind of war power does the Constitution grant the President and Congress? What limitations apply to each branch concerning the power to declare war and the use of military force? Over time, how has the Framers’ understanding been followed and in what ways has it been ignored? Do the founding principles regarding these topics still have application to our modern era? Former Congressman Mickey Edwards and National Review Institute Senior Fellow Andrew C. McCarthy joined us for an insightful discussion of these and other topics.

This event was held on July 7, 2017, at the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington, DC.

Featuring:

  • Hon. Mickey Edwards, Former Congressman, Vice President and Program Director, Rodel Fellowships In Public Leadership, Aspen Institute
  • Andrew C. McCarthy, Senior Fellow, National Review Institute
  • Moderator: Nate Kaczmarek, Deputy Director, Article I Initiative, The Federalist Society

Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC

Turkey in NATO - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
Alan Makovsky, Blaise Misztal July 07, 2017

Turkey’s President Erdogan has secured authoritarian rule through constitutional restructuring. He does not tolerate dissent and has arrested journalists, prosecutors, judges, military officials, police, academics and civil servants. Turkey would arguably not qualify to join NATO today. Turkey is seeking common cause with Russia and Iran. Erdogan has called America’s Kurdish allies in Syria “terrorists” and launched air strikes against them. NATO has never expelled a member state. When are the risks to NATO countries’ security and intelligence compelling enough to consider expelling Turkey? Are other, lesser sanctions an option? What would be the mechanism to accomplish this?

Featuring: 

  • Alan Makovsky, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress
  • Blaise Misztal, Director of National Security, Bipartisan Policy Center