MENU

Law of War

Dealing with Putin’s Russia: What is the Best Approach? - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
Brian H. Hook, Heather Hurlburt August 05, 2014

From the time he entered office after being tapped by Boris Yeltsin to succeed him, President Vladimir Putin’s overarching objective was to consolidate power – at home and abroad.  From earlier focuses on the Russian economy and quashing internal rivals, President Putin now seeks to recover geo-strategic assets lost in the Soviet collapse, which he called “the greatest geo-political catastrophe of the 20th century.”

President Putin's adventurism in the “post-Soviet space” was previously limited to cyber-activities in the Baltics, widespread regional economic and security pressure, and the 2008 invasion of Georgia.  But in 2014 he aimed far higher by invading and annexing Crimea and then destabilizing eastern Ukraine.  The downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 by Russian-backed separatists in Ukraine has caused the West to re-assess its overall approach to Russia.

What is President Putin up to? How far will he go?  What should the United States do to deter President Putin's ambitions to make Russia the dominant power in Eurasia?  And what are our European allies willing to do?

  • Hon. Brian H. Hook, Founder, Latitude, LLC and former Assistant U.S. Secretary of State for International Organization Affairs
  • Ms. Heather Hurlburt, Senior Fellow in National Security, Human Rights First

Point of Attack: Preventative War, International Law, and Global Welfare - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
John C. Yoo, Michael W. Lewis May 23, 2014

Point of Attack

The world today is overwhelmed by wars between nations and within nations, wars that have dominated American politics for quite some time. Point of Attack?: Preventative War, International Law, and Global Welfare calls for a new understanding of the grounds for war. In this book, University of California at Berkeley School of Law Professor John Yoo argues that the new threats to international security come not from war between the great powers, but from the internal collapse of states, terrorist groups, the spread of weapons of mass destruction, and destabilizing regional powers. In Point of Attack, he rejects the widely-accepted framework built on the U.N. Charter and replaces it with a new system consisting of defensive, pre-emptive, or preventive measures to encourage wars that advance global welfare. Professor Yoo concludes with an analysis of the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, failed states, and the current challenges posed by Libya, Syria, North Korea, and Iran. Professor Yoo and Ohio Northern University College of Law Professor Michael W. Lewis explored the premises of Professor Yoo’s book and the ways super powers might respond and adapt to the changing geopolitical landscape.

  • Professor John C. Yoo, Emanuel S. Heller Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley School of Law, and author of Point of Attack
  • Professor Michael W. Lewis, Professor of Law, Ohio Northern University Claude W. Pettit College of Law

Drones and Presidential Authority - Event Audio/Video

2014 Annual Student Symposium
Rosa Brooks, Martin Flaherty, Gregory G. Katsas, Michael S. Paulsen, Eileen O'Connor March 25, 2014

Drones and Presidential Authority - Event Audio/VideoA key element of America’s national security strategy has been the use of drones to carry out targeted killings against suspected terrorists. Targeted killings have become increasingly controversial, critics argue that the strikes violate the sovereignty of the nations where the attacks occur, and when those strikes occur outside circumstances of armed conflict amount to extrajudicial killings in violation of international human rights law. The U.S. contends that the strikes are part of America’s armed conflict with al Qaeda, and therefore are lawful strategies pursued pursuant to that armed conflict. Under what circumstances does the President have the authority to order the killing of suspected terrorists? Does he require statutory authorization, such as an Authorization for Use of Military Force, or can he rely on his own inherent power? Is the President bound to abide by treaties and customary international law prohibitions on the use of force? What due process rights are U.S. citizens entitled to when the President chooses to use military force against them? May the President use force against suspected terrorists inside the U.S.?

The University of Florida Student Chapter hosted this panel discussion during the 2014 Annual Student Symposium on Saturday, March 8, 2014.

Panel 3: “DRONES AND PRESIDENTIAL AUTHORITY”
3:45 – 5:30 p.m.
J. Wayne Reitz Union

  • Prof. Rosa Brooks, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Prof. Martin Flaherty, Leitner Family Professor of Law, Fordham University School of Law
  • Mr. Gregory Katsas, Partner, Jones Day
  • Prof. Michael Stokes Paulsen, Distinguished University Chair and Professor, University of St. Thomas School of Law
  • Moderator: Hon. Eileen J. O'Connor, Partner, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP

University of Florida Levin College of Law
Gainesville, FL

[Watch or listen now!]

Detained Suspected Terrorists: Try in Military Courts or Civilian Courts? - Event Audio/Video

2014 Annual Student Symposium
Laura Donohue, Christopher Jenks, Peter S. Margulies, Deborah Pearlstein, A. Raymond Randolph March 25, 2014

Detained Suspected Terrorists: Try in Military Courts or Civilian Courts? - Event Audio/VideoThis panel will address the ongoing debate regarding trying, convicting and punishing suspected terrorists. Should military tribunals be abandoned in favor of trying individuals in Article III courts? A mere seven individuals held in Guantanamo Bay have been tried and convicted by military commissions, while DOJ reports that more than 500 individuals have been convicted of terrorism related offenses. What has prevented the trial of suspected terrorists held in Guantanamo Bay? Should military commissions for suspected terrorists and other enemies be abandoned or do they serve a valuable function?

The University of Florida Student Chapter hosted this panel discussion during the 2014 Annual Student Symposium on Saturday, March 8, 2014.

Panel 2: “DETAINED SUSPECTED TERRORISTS: TRY IN MILITARY COURTS OR CIVILIAN COURTS?”
1:45 – 3:30 p.m.
J. Wayne Reitz Union

  • Prof. Laura Donohue, Professor of Law Georgetown University Law Center
  • Prof. Christopher Jenks, Director of the Criminal Justice Clinic and Assistant Professor of Law, Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law
  • Prof. Peter S. Margulies, Professor of Law, Roger Williams University School of Law
  • Prof. Deborah Pearlstein, Assistant Professor of Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
  • Moderator: Hon. A. Raymond Randolph, U.S. Court of Appeals, DC Circuit

University of Florida Levin College of Law
Gainesville, FL

[Watch or listen now!]

Balancing Privacy and Security - Event Audio/Video

2014 Annual Student Symposium
Devon Westhill, Robert H. Jerry, Rachel Brand, Steven G. Bradbury, Julian Sanchez, John F. Stinneford, Theodore W. Ullyot, William H. Pryor Jr. March 25, 2014

Balancing Privacy and Security - Event Audio/VideoThis roundtable will address a wide range of issues and potential solutions to the challenges associated with balancing privacy and security in an increasingly technological world. In an era where individuals increasingly entrust their data to third parties, how can the right balance be struck between the government’s need to collect information, and the individual’s right to privacy in that information. Does the Fourth Amendment adequately protect an individual’s rights in an era of rapidly advancing technology, or should Congress play a more active role in regulating this space?

The University of Florida Student Chapter hosted this roundtable discussion during the 2014 Annual Student Symposium on Friday, March 7, 2014.

Introductory Remarks
6:00 p.m.
J. Wayne Reitz Union

  • Mr. Devon Westhill, Chairman, Symposium Executive Committee
  • Dean Robert H. Jerry II, University of Florida Levin College of Law

Roundtable Discussion: “BALANCING PRIVACY AND SECURITY”
6:15 – 8:00 p.m.
J. Wayne Reitz Union

  • Mr. Steven G. Bradbury, Partner, Dechert LLP
  • Hon. Rachel L. Brand, Vice President & Chief Counsel for Regulatory Litigation, National Chamber Litigation Center, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Member, Privacy & Civil Liberties Oversight Board
  • Mr. Julian Sanchez, Research Fellow, The Cato Institute
  • Prof. John Stinneford, Associate Professor of Law, University of Florida Levin College of Law
  • Mr. Ted Ullyot, Former General Counsel, Facebook
  • Moderator: Hon. William H. Pryor Jr., U.S. Court of Appeals, Eleventh Circuit

University of Florida Levin College of Law
Gainesville, FL

[Watch or listen now!]