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Race Discrimination

Former United States Attorney General Meese on Voter ID Laws

Civil Rights and Free Speech & Election Law Practice Group Teleforum January 29, 12:00 PMFederalist Society Teleforum Conference Call

Numerous states have passed voter identification laws, and the Supreme Court has permitted them to remain in effect. Nonetheless, voter ID remains a highly controversial issue. Former United States Attorney General Edwin Meese III will discuss voter fraud and the importance of voter ID laws and answer audience questions on a live Teleforum conference call.

  • Hon. Edwin Meese III, Ronald Reagan Distinguished Fellow in Public Policy, The Heritage Foundation

Disparate Impact Liability and the Fair Housing Act: Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Todd F. Gaziano January 22, 2015

On Wednesday, January 21, 2015, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project Inc. The Supreme Court has previously attempted twice to hear cases reaching the question of whether disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act, in Magner v. Gallagher and Mount Holly v. Mount Holly Gardens Citizens in Action, and in both instances the cases were settled less than a month before oral arguments. The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to “refuse to sell or rent . . . or to refuse to negotiate for the sale or rental of, or otherwise make unavailable or deny, a dwelling to any person because of race.” Do policies that can be demonstrated to have a discriminatory effect on certain racial groups, without a showing of discriminatory intent, violate the statute?

  • Hon. Todd F. Gaziano, Executive Director, Washington, D.C. Center and Senior Fellow in Constitutional Law, Pacific Legal Foundation

College Admissions and Affirmative Action - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Edward Blum, William Consovoy January 09, 2015

The battle over the use of affirmative action in college admissions seems far from over, as the recent filing of two federal lawsuits demonstrates. The Project for Fair Representation recently sued both Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for allegedly capping the number of Asian-Americans they admit and using racial classifications to engage in invidious discrimination. Edward Blum and William Consovoy provided a litigation update on these and other cases.

  • Edward Blum, Director, The Project on Fair Representation
  • William Consovoy, Partner, Consovoy McCarthy PLLC

Challenging Racial Preferences in Government Contracts - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
David F. Barton, Roger B. Clegg October 17, 2014

While the Supreme Court in City of Richmond v. J.A. Croson Co. (1989) and Adarand Constructors, Inc. v. Pena (1995) handed down landmark decisions against the use of racial preferences in government contracting, the practice continues. One of the largest such federal programs is run by the Small Business Administration, but Rothe Development Co. has now challenged it, in a case where the federal district court will hear oral argument later this month. The lawyer in that case -- who also represented Rothe in its successful challenge to a similar U.S. Department of Defense program -- is David Barton, and he discussed the case in this Teleforum. Also participating in the discussion was Roger Clegg, President and General Counsel of the Center for Equal Opportunity.

  • David F. Barton, Partner, The Gardner Law Firm
  • Roger Clegg, President and General Counsel, Center for Equal Opportunity

Race-based Admissions Revisited: Fisher v. University of Texas - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Andrew Grossman September 19, 2014

On July 25, 2014, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals issued its decision in Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin, on remand from the Supreme Court of the United States.  In a 2-1 decision, the panel upheld the University of Texas' affirmative action policies, "persuaded by UT-Austin ... of its necessary use of race in a holistic process and the want of workable alternatives that would not require even greater use of race."  Was this decision consistent with the Supreme Court's 7-1 decision in June 2013?  What will happen going forward?  Our expert answered these and other questions for a live call-in audience.

  • Andrew Grossman, Associate, Baker & Hostetler LLP and Adjunct Scholar, The Cato Institute