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Interview with Kirsten Powers - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Lawyers Convention
Kirsten Powers, Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz November 24, 2015

On November 14, 2015, during the Federalist Society's 2015 National Lawyers Convention in Washington, DC, Professor Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz of the Georgetown University Law Center interviewed USA Today Columnist, Daily Beast Columnist, and FOX News Contributor Ms. Kirsten Powers.

Interview with Kirsten Powers
12:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Grand Ballroom

  • Ms. Kirsten Powers, USA Today Columnist, Daily Beast Columnist, and FOX News Contributor
  • Interviewed by: Prof. Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, Georgetown University Law Center and Federalist Society Board of Directors

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC

Note: There were technical issues with Prof. Rosenkranz's microphone at the beginning of the video during his introduction, but the issues were resolved by the time the interview begins.

A Right to Speak Anonymously? Political Contributors and Reporters’ Confidential Sources - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Lawyers Convention
Andrew Grossman, Stephen R. Klein, Paul S. Ryan, Hans A. von Spakovsky, Robert P. Young, Jr., Manuel Klausner November 18, 2015

Supporters of mandated disclosure of the source of speech (or of money used to pay for speech) claim it can provide important information to the public and the legal system. But opponents say it violates privacy rights and can also deter the sources from speaking or contributing.

This debate also applies to reporters' confidential sources. In both situations, disclosure (of who contributed or spent, or who a confidential source was) may provide useful information to voters, prosecutors, civil litigants, judges, or jurors. In both situations, requiring disclosure of the source may deter people from contributing to controversial campaigns or organizations, or from talking to journalists. Politically, people tend to react differently to these reactions – confidentiality of contributors tends to be more supported by conservatives, while confidentiality of journalists' sources tends to be more supported by liberals. But structurally, are these issues similar? This panel will consider both these questions together.

Free Speech: A Right to Speak Anonymously?  Political Contributors and Reporters’ Confidential Sources
3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
State Room

  • Mr. Andrew M. Grossman, Associate, BakerHostetler
  • Mr. Stephen Klein, Pillar of Law Institute
  • Mr. Paul S. Ryan, Senior Counsel, Campaign Legal Center
  • Hon. Hans von Spakovsky, Manager, Election Law Reform Initiative and Senior Legal Fellow, The Heritage Foundation
  • Moderator: Hon. Robert P. Young, Jr., Chief Justice, Supreme Court of Michigan
  • Introduction: Mr. Manuel Klausner, Co-Founder, Trustee, and Legal Advisor, Reason Foundation and General Counsel, Individual Rights Foundation

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC

The Court Speaks on Free Speech - Podcast

Free Speech & Election Law Practice Group Podcast
Eugene Volokh June 24, 2015

On Jun 18, the U.S. Supreme Court decided two cases with free speech implications. In Walker v. Texas Division, Sons of Confederate Veterans, the Court held that the speech involved in a specialty license plate was government speech, and the government can regulate its content. In Reed v. Town of Gilbert, the Court held that the content-based time, size and location regulation of a church's signage did not pass strict scrutiny. Our expert discussed the details of the opinions and took questions from the audience.

  • Prof. Eugene Volokh, Gary T. Schwartz Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law

Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International - Post-Argument SCOTUScast

SCOTUScast 4-26-13 featuring Erik Jaffe
Erik S. Jaffe April 26, 2013

Erik JaffeOn April 22, 2013, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International, Inc.  The question in the case is whether  United States Leadership Against HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Act of 2003, 22 U.S.C. § 7631(f), which requires an organization to have a policy explicitly opposing prostitution and sex trafficking in order to receive federal funding to provide HIV and AIDS programs overseas, violates the First Amendment.

To discuss the case we have Erik Jaffe, a Washington, D.C. attorney who specializes in appellate litigation.

[Listen now!]

Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate - Event Audio

Indianapolis Lawyers Chapter
Greg Lukianoff, Brian J. Paul April 19, 2013

Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate - Event AudioOn April 11, 2013, the Indianapolis Lawyers Chapter of the Federalist Society hosted an event featuring Greg Lukianoff, President of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education. Mr. Lukianoff discussed his new book "Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of the American Debate". Introduction by Mr. Brian J. Paul of Ice Miller LLP and President of the Indianapolis Lawyers Chapter.