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Why is the FAA regulating recreational drone use?

Short video featuring Gregory S. McNeal
Gregory S. McNeal January 27, 2016

Gregory S. McNeal, Associate Professor of Law and Public Policy at Pepperdine School of Law, discusses new regulations concerning recreational drone use recently issued by the FAA.  Professor McNeal explains that these new regulations represent an enormous break from the past, and likely stem from the widespread and increasing popularity of drones.

Broadband Re-regulation: The Battle Returns to the Courts - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Lawyers Convention
Earl W. Comstock, Miguel Estrada, Roslyn Layton, David B. Sentelle, Kelly A. Donohue November 18, 2015

Panelists will examine the impact of the FCC's Open Internet Order and reclassification of broadband as a public utility and explore possible alternative regulatory regimes. What will the courts do? What should Congress do? What should a new Administration make its first broadband priorities? ‎With the convergence of technologies, should the current platform-specific regulation be replaced with a more flexible, service-based regulatory scheme? How could such regulations impact developing business models and evolving technologies? How is the US faring against the rest of the world in the quest for broadband leadership?

Telecommunications: Broadband Re-regulation: The Battle Returns to the Courts
3:45 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.
East Room

  • Mr. Earl W. Comstock, Partner, Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC
  • Mr. Miguel A. Estrada, Partner, Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP
  • Ms. Roslyn Layton, Visiting Fellow, American Enterprise Institute
  • Mr. Robert Quinn, Senior Vice-President – Federal Regulatory and Chief Privacy Officer, AT&T
  • Moderator: Hon. David B. Sentelle, U.S. Court of Appeals, D.C. Circuit
  • Introduction: Ms. Kelly A. Donohue, Partner, Wilkinson Barker Knauer LLP

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC

"Going Dark" and the Intersection of Law Enforcement and Privacy Interests - Podcast

Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Podcast
Peter Swire, Benjamin Wittes September 30, 2015

FBI Director James Comey recently testified before Congress about what he characterized as law enforcement's increasing lack of technical ability to carry out court orders to intercept and access communications and information because of a fundamental shift in communications services and technologies. This issue has been coined the “going dark" problem. According to Comey, changes in technology such as encryption hinder law enforcement’s ability to use investigative tools and follow critical leads to stop terrorists and cyber criminals.

Is "going dark" a real problem, or are Director Comey's concerns overblown? Do the means exist to develop techniques and tools, designed to mitigate the challenges associated with "going dark," while maintaining the privacy-protecting attributes of the technologies at issue?

Featuring:

  • Prof. Peter Swire, Nancy J. and Lawrence P. Huang Professor of Law and Ethics, Scheller College of Business, Georgia Institute of Technology and Senior Counsel, Alston & Bird LLP
  • Mr. Benjamin Wittes, Senior Fellow, Governance Studies, The Brookings Institution

The Telecommunications Act: Can it Rein in the FCC? - Audio/Video

Third Annual Executive Branch Review Conference
Jonathan Adelstein, Kelly Cole, Grace Koh, David B. Quinalty, Scott Belcher June 23, 2015

The communications and technology sectors have seen an explosion of growth and innovation over the last decade, and yet the primary body of law governing these areas, The Communications Act, has not been updated since the days of dial-up internet. In 2013, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Fred Upton (Mich.) and Communications and Technology Subcommittee Chairman Greg Walden (Oreg.) announced that they would commence efforts to “update the law to better meet the dynamic needs of the 21st century.” In January, Senate Commerce Committee Chairman John Thune (S. Dak.) announced similar plans.

Our panel will discuss recent efforts to update the Communications Act for the modern internet age. What should a new framework look like? With the convergence of technologies, should the current platform-specific regulation be replaced with a more flexible, service-based regulatory scheme? Should special considerations still apply in certain services? How could such regulations impact developing business models and evolving technologies? Should the scope of the FCC’s jurisdiction remain the same? These and other issues will be explored.

This panel was presented on June 18, 2015, at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC during the Third Annual Executive Branch Review Conference.

The Telecommunications Act: Can it Rein in the FCC?
9:40 – 11:10 a.m.
Senate Room

  • Mr. Jonathan Adelstein, President & CEO, PCIA - The Wireless Infrastructure Association
  • Ms. Kelly Cole, National Association of Broadcasters
  • Ms. Grace Koh, U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce
  • Mr. David B. Quinalty, U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation
  • Moderator: Mr. Scott Belcher, Telecommunications Industry Association

June 18, 2015
Washington, DC