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Bitcoin: Competitive Currency

Short video featuring Max Raskin
Max Raskin March 30, 2017

Can Bitcoin compete with other currencies around the world? Max Raskin, Research Fellow at the Institute for Judicial Administration at the New York University School of Law, discusses legal tender laws and the monopoly powers they give to central banks - and possible benefits that a virtual currency could provide to developing countries. 

Courthouse Steps: Packingham v. North Carolina - Podcast

Free Speech & Election Law Practice Group Podcast
Ilya Shapiro March 02, 2017

In Packingham v. North Carolina, the Supreme Court will decide whether the First Amendment bars a state from banning citizens from accessing social media sites like Facebook and Twitter. A North Carolina state makes it a felony for any person on the state's registry of former sex offenders to "access" a wide array of websites--including Facebook, YouTube, and nytimes.com--that enable communications among users if the site is known to allow minors to have accounts. The statute does not require the state to prove the defendant has actually had contact with a minor, intended to do so, or accessed a website for any illicit or improper purpose. ​Lester Packingham was convicted of violating the law for a Facebook post in which he celebrated the dismissal of a traffic ticket, declaring "God is Good!" Packingham and his supporters contend that law amounts to a sweeping, overbroad, and vague ban on protected speech untailored to any legitimate interest and unjustified by any compelling need.

Featuring:

  • Ilya Shapiro, Senior Fellow in Constitutional Studies, Cato Institute

Regulating Rideshare: The Rise of the Sharing Economy

Short video on the Sharing Economy
January 05, 2017

The “Sharing Economy” is a complex phenomenon that has disrupted industries and transformed how we live and work, but experts can’t even agree on what to call it. Lawyers, public policy experts, academics and workers weigh in to define this dynamic phenomenon and to discuss legal and regulatory issues that emerge as these platforms play an increasingly role in our society. 

Justice Scalia's Telecommunications Legacy - Event Audio/Video

2016 National Lawyers Convention
Richard A. Epstein, Henry Goldberg, Richard E. Wiley, Don R. Willett November 23, 2016

Justice Scalia first entered public service in 1971, when he was appointed by President Richard Nixon to serve as the General Counsel for the Office of Telecommunications Policy (“OTP") in the White House. From that day in 1971 through his dissent in the Brand X case regarding broadband classification, Justice Scalia brought a deep understanding of technology policy to his career on the Supreme Court. And of course, Justice Scalia was never one to mince words. “It would be gross understatement to say that the Telecommunications Act of 1996 is not a model of clarity. It is in many important respects a model of ambiguity or indeed even self-contradiction," he observed in AT&T Corp. v. Iowa Util. Bd. The Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group has brought together a panel of experts to discuss Justice Scalia's legacy on telecommunications and media issues and discuss current litigation through the lens of his jurisprudence.

This panel was held on November 18, 2016, during the 2016 National Lawyers Convention in Washington, DC.

Telecommunications & Electronic Media: Justice Scalia's Telecommunications Legacy
12:30 p.m. – 2:45 p.m.
Chinese Room

  • Prof. Richard A. Epstein, Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law, Director, Classical Liberal Institute, New York University School of Law
  • Mr. Henry Goldberg, Goldberg, Godles, Wiener and Wright LLP
  • Mr. Richard E. Wiley, Chairman Emeritus, Wiley Rein LLP
  • Moderator: Hon. Don Willett, Texas Supreme Court

The Mayflower Hotel
Washington, DC