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Telecommunications & Electronic Media

The Future of Media: Is Government Regulation In Today's Media Landscape "Over-The-Top"? - Event Audio/Video

The Future of Media
Jeffrey Blum, Rick Kaplan, Barry Ohlson, Ryan Radia, Patricia J. Paoletta February 26, 2015

The Federalist Society's Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group and its George Washington University Law School Student Chapter co-sponsored a conference on the Future of Media -- examining the government's role in light of today's rapidly evolving media landscape. The conference took place at The George Washington University Law School on February 25, 2015.

Panel Presentation
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

  • Jeffrey H. Blum, Senior Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, DISH Network Corporation
  • Rick Kaplan, General Counsel and Executive Vice President of Legal Affairs, National Association of Broadcasters
  • Barry J. Ohlson, Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, Cox Enterprises
  • Ryan Radia, Associate Director of Technology Studies, Competitive Enterprise Institute
  • Moderator: Patricia J. Paoletta, Partner, Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis LLP

The George Washington University Law School
Washington, DC

Address by FTC Commissioner Joshua D. Wright - Event Audio/Video

The Future of Media
Joshua D. Wright, Anthony Glosson, Bryan N. Tramont February 26, 2015

The Federalist Society's Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group and its George Washington University Law School Student Chapter co-sponsored a conference on the Future of Media -- examining the government's role in light of today's rapidly evolving media landscape. The conference took place at The George Washington University Law School on February 25, 2015.

Keynote Address
12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

  • Introduction: Mr. Bryan N. Tramont, Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP and Chairman, Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group
  • Introduction: Mr. Anthony Glosson, Student Member, Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group and Editor-in-Chief, Federal Communications Law Journal
  • Hon. Joshua D. Wright, Commissioner, Federal Trade Commission

The George Washington University Law School
Washington, DC

T-Mobile v. City of Roswell - Post-Decision SCOTUScast

SCOTUScast 2-11-15 featuring Megan Brown
Megan L. Brown February 11, 2015

On January 14, 2015, the Supreme Court issued its decision in T-Mobile South, LLC v. City of Roswell. This case concerns whether a document from a state or local government stating that an application has been denied, but listing no reasons for the denial, can satisfy the Communications Act’s “in writing” requirement.

In an opinion delivered by Justice Sotomayor, the Court held that the written document issued by a state or local government denying the application for a cell tower does not need to contain the reasons for denial as long as the reasons for denial appear in some other written record, are clearly written, and are accessible to the applicant essentially contemporaneously with the written denial notice.

Justices Scalia, Kennedy, Breyer, Alito, and Kagan joined the opinion of the Court. Justice Alito filed a concurring opinion. Chief Justice Roberts filed a dissenting opinion which Justice Ginsburg joined in full and which Justice Thomas joined as to Part 1. Justice Thomas filed a dissenting opinion. The judgment of the Eleventh Circuit was reversed and the case remanded for further proceedings.

To discuss the case, we have Megan Brown, who is a partner at WileyRein.

The Reach of Federal Warrants - The Microsoft Case - Podcast

Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Podcast
James M. Garland, David Howard February 11, 2015

In December of 2014, Microsoft filed a brief with the Federal Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit in New York to prevent the U.S. Department of Justice from seizing a customer’s data stored in Dublin, Ireland. It’s a case that raises important questions about the right of Americans to know what the government and companies are doing with sensitive electronic data. How do we ensure accountability both to the law through reasonable regulation, and to the courts through effective judicial review? The case also raises questions about the rights of people in other countries. Will they continue to have their privacy rights protected by their own laws? Anticipating a world where every device is a connected device, these are but a few of the important questions raised by this case regarding the future of privacy and regulations going forward.

  • James M. Garland, Partner, Covington & Burling LLP
  • David Howard, Corporate Vice President & Deputy General Counsel, Microsoft