MENU

The Unbearable Rightness of Marbury v. Madison: Its Real Lessons and Irrepressible Myths

The Birmingham Lawyers Chapter

Start : Wednesday, May 04, 2011 12:00 PM

End : Wednesday, May 04, 2011 02:00 PM


Add To Your Calendar

   


Location:
The Summit Club
1901 Sixth Avenue North
Birmingham, AL

Featured Speakers:
William H. Pryor Jr.

Description:

Speaker:

  • Judge William H. Pryor, Jr., U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit

For the last several years, Judge Pryor has taught Federal Jurisdiction at the University of Alabama School of Law, and like many teachers of that subject, he begins by requiring his students to read and discuss what is by all accounts the most famous – and momentous – decision in U.S. Supreme Court history, Marbury v. Madison.  As Judge Pryor will explain, while there are many useful lessons in that famous decision, much of what Americans have been told during the last century about Marbury is wrong.

Marbury, Judge Pryor contends, is a victim of historical revisionism.  Marbury is often described as the event in which Americans invented judicial review.  That notion, Judge Pryor says, is manifestly untrue.  So too, Marbury is routinely cited as supporting judicial supremacy, but, Judge Pryor maintains, it does nothing of the sort.  Finally, while Marbury is often celebrated as a triumph of judicial activism, Judge Pryor argues that proposition is likewise false.  In fact, he says, Marbury v. Madison is an example of judicial restraint.  All Americans, especially lawyers and judges, need to learn more about Marbury.  By providing a different look at Marbury, Judge Pryor aims to expose both its real lessons and its irrepressible myths.

Registration details:

Cost: $15 for lunch (please pay at the door and make checks payable to “The Federalist Society”).

Please RSVP by Friday, April 29, to Carolyn Adkins at cadkins@babc.com , 205-521-8687, or “Attend” this event posted on our Facebook page.

This course has been approved by the Mandatory Continuing Legal Education Commission of Alabama for 1 CLE credit.