MENU

FACULTY DIVISION

2015 James Kent Summer Academy
2015 James Kent Summer Academy 2015 Faculty Division Summer Conference for Students Interested in Academia

Federalist Society with the American Constitution Society and the National Constitution Center

The National Constitution Center, the Federalist Society and the American Constitution Society presented this debate on Citizens United. Professor Anthony Johnstone, argued in favor of the resolution and Professor John McGinnis argued against the resolution. Jeffrey Rosen, President and Chief Executive Officer of the National Constitution Center, moderated the program.

This debate was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation. 

Speakers:

  • Prof. Anthony Johnstone, University of Montana School of Law
  • Prof. John McGinnis, Northwestern University School of Law
  • Moderator: Prof. Jeffrey Rosen, President and CEO, National Constitution Center

May 12, 2015
Boston, MA

The opinions expressed in this debate are those of the participants and do not necessarily reflect the views of the John Templeton Foundation.

2015 National Security Symposium

The Federalist Society's International & National Security Law Practice Group presented this luncheon address during the 2015 National Security Symposium on April 29 in Washington, D.C.

Luncheon Address: "National Insecurity: Is the Law the Enemy's Weapon?"
11:45 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

  • Andrew C. McCarthy, Senior Fellow, National Review Institute

April 29, 2015
Washington, DC

2015 National Security Symposium

The Federalist Society's International & National Security Law Practice Group presented this panel during the 2015 National Security Symposium on April 29 in Washington, D.C.

Panel II: "Are We @Cyberwar, and If So, How Should We Fight It?"
10:30 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Several significant cyber incidents, including the recent Sony hack, have been attributed to nation-states or groups closely associated with nation-states.  The Intelligence Community's most recent Worldwide Threat Assessment predicts "an ongoing series of low-to-moderate level cyber attacks from a variety of sources over time, which will impose cumulative costs on U.S. economic competitiveness and national security."  It identifies Russia, China, Iran and North Korea as Threat Actors.  An expert panel will analyze whether any cyber incidents should be considered acts of war, whether U.S. responses be governed by the Law of Armed Conflict, what kinds of incidents warrant responses, and what those responses might be.

  • Hon. Stewart A. Baker, Partner, Steptoe & Johnson LLP, former Assistant Secretary of Policy, Department of Homeland Security, and former General Counsel, National Security Agency
  • Prof. Eric Talbot Jensen, Brigham Young University Law School, and former Chief, International Law, Office of The Judge Advocate General, U.S. Army
  • Catherine B. Lotrionte, Director, CyberProject, School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, and former former Counsel to the President's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board, former Assistant General Counsel, Office of General Counsel, Central Intelligence Agency
  • Prof. John C. Yoo, Emanuel S. Heller Professor of Law, University of California Berkeley School of Law, former Deputy Assistant U.S. Attorney General, Office of Legal Counsel
  • Moderator: Prof. Jeremy A. Rabkin, George Mason University School of Law

April 29, 2015
Washington, DC

2015 National Security Symposium

The Federalist Society's International & National Security Law Practice Group presented this panel during the 2015 National Security Symposium on April 29 in Washington, D.C.

Welcome and Introduction
8:55 a.m.

  • Dean A. Reuter, Vice President and Director of Practice Groups, The Federalist Society

Panel I: "How to Manage the Intelligence Community"
9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.

Since September 11, 2001, the intelligence community has been at the center of key national security events including the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, the hunt for Osama Bin Laden and other key terrorism figures, leaks by Edward Snowden, and disclosures about the CIA's rendition program. During that same period of time, the management of the intelligence community has been reformed, executive agencies have reorganized themselves to better interact with the intelligence community, and most recently, the CIA has announced a fundamental reorganization of its key functions. Our panel will consider how the government can best manage the intelligence community. We will discuss the role of Congressional oversight, the ability to demand accountability, whether the current structure of the intelligence community is optimal, and if effectiveness measures can be applied to intelligence work.

  • Michael Allen, Managing Director, Beacon Global Strategies LLC, former Majority Staff Director, House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and former Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Counter-proliferation Strategy
  • Eli Lake, Columnist, Bloomberg View
  • Hon. Benjamin A. Powell, Partner, WilmerHale LLP, and former General Counsel to the Director of National Intelligence
  • Moderator: Matthew R.A. Heiman, Vice President, Chief Compliance & Audit Officer, Tyco

April 29, 2015
Washington, DC

Financial Services & E-Commerce Practice Group Podcast

Members of the Federalist Society’s Financial Services & E-Commerce Practice Group Executive Committee provided an update on important activity at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB).  Developments included the CFPB's adoption of a final policy on publishing consumer complaint narratives, a moratorium on credit card issuers submitting their credit card agreements to the CFPB, the Office of Management and Budget's threat of recommending the veto of a bill that would reduce the CFPB's budget by 0.1% over then next ten years, and the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals decision to uphold the dismissal on procedural grounds in Morgan Drexen, Inc. v. CFPB, a suit challenging the constitutionality of the CFPB.

  • Hon. Wayne A. Abernathy, Executive VP for Financial Institutions Policy and Regulatory Affairs, American Bankers Association
  • Julius L. Loeser, Of Counsel, Winston & Strawn LLP
SCOTUScast 5-21-15 featuring Paul Mirengoff

On April 29, 2015, the Supreme Court issued its decision in Mach Mining v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. This case involves the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's (EEOC) Title VII duty to investigate claims of discrimination levied against an employer and to make good faith efforts to eliminate discriminatory employment practices before filing suit against that employer. The question this case asks is whether and to what extent a court may enforce the EEOC's duty to conciliate discrimination claims before filing suit.

In a unanimous opinion delivered by Justice Kagan, the Court held that courts have the authority to review whether the EEOC has fulfilled its statutory duty to conciliate discrimination claims prior to filing suit against an employer. The judgment of the Seventh Circuit was vacated and remanded.

To discuss the case, we have Mr. Paul Mirengoff. Mr. Mirengoff is a retired attorney in Washington, D.C. and is a blogger at powerlineblog.com.