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FACULTY DIVISION

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2016 Paul M. Bator Award Nominations due by September 11, 2015.

 
Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Podcast

Is Clay v. United States, currently pending in the 11th Circuit, a case study of overcriminalization and abusive federal prosecution? The case raises basic notions of due process, fair notice, the rule of lenity, mens rea, and actus reus. What began as a highly publicized raid by some 200 FBI agents on a Florida health care company over an accounting dispute of how to interpret a provision in Florida’s Medicaid reimbursement statute with no clarifying administrative regulations, ended in the indictment, conviction, and prison sentences for the company’s top executives for fraud. This case is particularly important for all regulated industries, where there are numerous and ambiguous laws and complex regulations governing conduct subject to administrative, civil, and criminal enforcement. John Lauro, counsel in the case, discussed the lawsuit, with Paul Kamenar joining to offer questions and comments.

  • Paul D. Kamenar, Washington, D.C. Attorney and Senior Fellow, Administrative Conference of the United States
  • John F. Lauro, Principal, Lauro Law Firm
  • Moderator: John G. Malcolm, Director and Ed Gilbertson and Sherry Lindberg Gilbertson Senior Legal Fellow, Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, The Heritage Foundation
Corporations, Securities & Antitrust Practice Group Podcast

The Supreme Court issued a number of notable opinions in the area of bankruptcy law during the recently concluded term. Our experts offered their analysis on recent developments in the field and took questions from a call-in audience.

  • Prof. Thomas Plank, Joel A. Katz Distinguished Professor of Law, University of Tennessee College of Law
  • Prof. Zvi Rosen Visiting Assistant Professor of Law, Hofstra University Maurice A. Deane School of Law
  • Prof. David Skeel, S. Samuel Arsht Professor of Corporate Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School
Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Podcast

On Thursday July 16, 2015, the Wisconsin Supreme Court issued an opinion and order ending the long running “John Doe” investigation into potential violations of Wisconsin campaign finance law and whether candidates and outside groups illegally “coordinated” spending. In mid-June of 2015, a young political consultant was sentenced to nearly two years in federal prison for illegally coordinating between a congressional campaign and a Super PAC. The U.S. Department of Justice also recently announced it will look carefully at allegations of coordination between candidate and outside groups. What does all of this mean? Where is the law heading on this? Are civil and criminal investigations into campaign activity going to be increasing?

  • Allen Dickerson, Legal Director, Center for Competitive Politics
  • Edward D. Greim, Partner, Graves Garrett LLC
  • Tara Malloy Senior Counsel, Campaign Legal Center
  • Moderator: Jason Torchinsky, Holtzman Vogel Josefiak PLLC
Labor & Employment Law Practice Group Podcast

July has been a busy month for the Department of Labor (DOL). On July 6th, DOL published proposed revisions to the “white collar” overtime regulations which would more than double the minimum salary level required for exemption. On July 10th, DOL defended its 2011 tip credit regulations before the Ninth Circuit in Oregon Restaurant & Lodging v. Perez. Last week, on July 15th, DOL issued new guidance – an “Administrator’s Interpretation” – concluding that “most” workers are employees, not independent contractors. A decision on the validity of DOL’s home care worker regulations is expected any day from the D.C. Circuit in Home Care Association v. Weil, and in August, DOL is expected to issue a request for information on the use of electronic devices by overtime-protected employees outside of scheduled work hours. In this teleforum, the Bush Administration’s wage-hour team at DOL provided a briefing on these developments and discussed what else we can expect from DOL over the next 18 months.

  • Paul DeCamp, Jackson Lewis P.C.
  • Alexander J. Passantino, Seyfarth & Shaw
Litigation Practice Group Teleforum

The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 instructs the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to study “the use of agreements providing for arbitration of any future dispute . . . in connection with the offering or providing of consumer financial products or services,” and to provide a report to Congress on the same topic.  This past March, the CFPB issued its study, pursuant to the statutory requirement.  Is the “arbitration study” an anti-arbitration study?  Our experts discussed the report and its implications.

  • Mr. Deepak Gupta, Founding Principal, Gupta Wessler PLLC
  • Mr. Andrew J. Pincus, Partner, Mayer Brown LLP
Practice Groups Podcast

In her book, The Story: A Reporter's Journey, former New York Times reporter Judith Miller describes going to jail to protect her sources in the investigation of the outing of CIA agent Valerie Plame over a decade ago. Her book catalogs new information that raises questions about the investigation. Bestselling author Arthur Herman led our discussion with the author.

  • Judith Miller, Author, Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute
  • Dr. Arthur L. Herman, Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute