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LAWYERS DIVISION


 
ABOUT THE LAWYERS DIVISION
The Federalist Society's Lawyers Division was founded in 1986 to bring together attorneys, business and policy leaders, judges and others interested in examining and improving the state of the law. The Lawyers Division reaches the legal community thr READ MORE
Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group Podcast

Should the United States Cede Control of the Internet? On Tuesday, May 24, the United States Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, will hold a hearing titled “Examining the Multistakeholder Plan for Transitioning the Internet Assigned Number Authority.” The hearing will examine the proposed transition of oversight of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA), a department of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) that allocates Internet IP addresses and domain names, to the global multistakeholder community. Our experts discussed the implications of the proposed transition.

Featuring:

  • John M.R. Kneuer, President and Founder, JKC Consulting LLC and Seinor Partner, Fairfax Media Partners
  • Shane Tews, Visiting Fellow, Center for Internet, Communications, and Technology Policy, American Enterprise Institute
Short video featuring Gregory S. McNeal

Gregory S. McNeal, Associate Professor of Law and Public Policy at Pepperdine School of Law, discusses the FAA’s approach to regulating the tiniest of drones: microdrones.

Criminal Law & Procedure Practice Group Podcast

The Supreme Court issued its 7-1 ruling in Foster v. Chatman on May 23, reversing the Supreme Court of Georgia and remanding the case. Foster was convicted of murder and sentenced to death three decades ago by an all-white jury. The prosecutor struck all of the black jurors and had plans to do so before the voir dire began. The prosecution presented several race-neutral reasons for striking the jurors, and the Georgia courts ruled against the Batson claim. Foster later gained access to the prosecution's jury-selection notes that showed some racial pretext and used them for a renewed Batson claim. The Georgia courts rejected the claim as barred by state res judicata. Chief Justice Roberts wrote for the majority of the court finding that the court did still have jurisdiction and impermissible racial pretext was apparent for at least two of the state's peremptory strikes. Justice Thomas wrote a firm dissent where he doubted the court's jurisdiction. This Teleforum discussed the ramifications of this decision on the future of Batson deference, res judicata, and how this case might affect capital appeals pending throughout the nation.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Joseph L. Hoffmann, Harry Pratter Professor of Law and Director for Strategic Projects, Indiana University Maurer School of Law
Miami Lawyers Chapter

Speakers:

  • Heather MacDonaldThomas W. Smith Fellow, The Manhattan Institute, New York City
  • Tamara Lawson - Associate Dean for Faculty Development & Professor of Law, St. Thomas University School of Law, Miami, Florida

Moderator, William Shepherd, Esq. - Partner, Holland & Knight, Former Florida Statewide Prosecutor