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STUDENT DIVISION

Special 3L Graduation Offer Free 1-year membership

ABOUT THE STUDENT DIVISION
Since its creation, the Student Division of the Federalist Society has played an integral role on law school campuses. Through its numerous conferences, programs, and publications, the Student Division seeks to accomplish three principal goals: READ MORE
2015 Faculty Division Summer Conference for Students Interested in Academia

The Federalist Society’s James Kent Summer Academy is a new program for students and recent graduates who demonstrate strong potential for being leaders among a future generation of legal scholars.  Participants will have an opportunity to engage in academic discourse, to learn about an academic career track, to deepen their understanding of key ideas about the law, the founding period, originalism, religious liberty, and markets and the law, and to receive some personalized career planning and publishing guidance.  Confirmed faculty include Randy Barnett, Nelson Lund, Mark Rienzi and Orin Kerr.

The Academy will take place in early August in Annapolis, MD.  This all-expenses-paid conference will include seminar-style sessions guided by a group of leading faculty, informational sessions and workshops for professional development, and the opportunity to connect to a community of talented students and scholars.  Participants will also receive invitations to ongoing events and academic and professional development resources throughout the year.  

The program is intended for students and recent graduates (three years or less out of law school), including prospective or current clerks, with a serious interest in an academic career, who would contribute to the intellectual diversity of the legal academy, and who are beginning to develop their legal scholarship.  Applicants should possess strong academic qualifications.

Religious Liberties Practice Group Podcast

Miriam Ibrahim is a Sudanese woman who was arrested in Sudan and charged with adultery in August 2013 on the grounds that her marriage to a Christian man from South Sudan was void under Sudan's version of Islamic law, which says Muslim women cannot marry non-Muslims. The court added the charge of apostasy in February 2014, and she was sentenced to hang after refusing to renounce Christianity. Though her father was Muslim, he left her Ethiopian Orthodox mother to raise her from early childhood, and she was raised a Christian. Though she eventually was released in July 2014 and is now living in the United States, her arrest raises the question of whether and how the United States should respond to instances of the denial of religious freedom in other countries.

  • Prof. Thomas F. Farr, Senior Fellow and Director, Religious Freedom Project, Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs, Georgetown University
  • Tina Ramírez, Founder and Executive Director, Hardwired, Inc.