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Patent Agreements, Patent Validity, and the Supreme Court - Podcast

Intellectual Property Practice Group Podcast
Gregory Dolin April 20, 2015

In two separate cases to be argued the week of March 30, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court continued to provide close oversight, often with critical disagreement, of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in the area of patent law. The Supreme Court will decide whether a patentee’s use of a royalty agreement that projects beyond the expiration date of the patent is unlawful per se. In a second case, the Court will determine whether a defendant's belief that a patent is invalid is a defense to induced infringement. Our expert was on hand to hear the oral arguments and reported to our Teleforum audience.

  • Prof. Gregory Dolin, Co-director, Center for Medicine and Law, University of Baltimore School of Law

When is a law too vague to be Constitutional?

Short video with Ilya Shapiro discussing Johnson v. United States
Ilya Shapiro April 18, 2015

Senior fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute and editor-in-chief of the Cato Supreme Court Review, Ilya Shapiro explains the confusion concerning what constitutes a violent felony conviction under the residual clause of the Armed Career Criminal Act. In this upcoming Supreme Court case, Petitioner Johnson claims the ACCA is unconstitutionally vague while the government asserts that Johnson’s conviction for possession of a short-barreled shotgun satisfies the violent felony requirement of the statute.

Ilya Shapiro is co-counsel on the amicus brief for the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, National Association of Federal Defenders, Families against Mandatory Minimums and the Cato Institute in support of the Petitioner.
 
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

Innovation and Inequality: Conservative and Libertarian Perspectives - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Student Symposium
Richard A. Epstein, Elizabeth Kregor, John O. McGinnis, Frank H. Easterbrook April 17, 2015

We are in an age of accelerating technology but many fear we are also in an age of growing inequality. Does the fast pace of innovation pose a threat to social stability? Many fear that machines will take away jobs from the less skilled and extend the reach of superstars, thus deepening inequality. This panel will address the dangers of innovation to employment and equality and what, if anything, the government should do about it.

  • Prof. Richard Epstein, NYU School of Law
  • Ms. Beth Kregor, Director of the Institute for Justice Clinic on Entrepreneurship at the University of Chicago Law School
  • Prof. John McGinnis, Northwestern University School of Law
  • Moderator: Hon. Frank Easterbrook, U.S. Court of Appeals, Seventh Circuit

This program was presented on February 21, 2015, as part of the 2015 Federalist Society National Student Symposium.

Innovation and Health Care - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Student Symposium
Peter Huber, Lindsay Kelly, Gerald Masoudi, Thomas B. Griffith April 17, 2015

Given that everyone is getting older and more prone to disease, medical innovation is one of the most important measures, if not the most important measure, of a successful health policy. Technological acceleration, including advances in genomics and stem cell research, suggest that we are on the cusp of a golden age of medical innovation. But government-imposed price controls and other policies can reduce the incentives for devising new treatments, resulting in preventable death and illness. This panel will look at the effect of Obamacare, and the policies of the FDA on innovation. More generally, will the current regulatory processes and reimbursement policies equipped to manage the next generation of personalized medicine and diagnostic devices?

  • Mr. Peter Huber, Senior Fellow, Manhattan Institute
  • Ms. Lindsay Kelly, Special Counsel, Irell & Manella LLP
  • Mr. Gerald Masoudi, Partner, Covington & Burling LLP; former Chief Counsel, Food and Drug Administration
  • Moderator: Hon. Thomas B. Griffith, U.S. Court of Appeals, District of Columbia Circuit

This program was presented on February 21, 2015, as part of the 2015 Federalist Society National Student Symposium.

Current Issues in Patent Law and Policy - Event Audio/Video

2015 National Student Symposium
Phyllis Turner-Brim, A. Douglas Melamed, Michael J. Meurer, Adam Mortara, Danny J. Boggs April 17, 2015

Our patent system has historically been thought to be an engine of innovation, but it is much criticized today. Is a one-size-fits all model for patent duration appropriate in today's technological environment or does it simply incentivize unnecessary litigation? For instance, the rapid pace of technological change in some areas may obviate the need of lengthy patents in some areas. Should certain innovation—such as business processes be patentable? Should the patent office be reorganized or split up to better assess patents. What other types of incentives, including those provided by copyright or prizes, provide alternatives to patents?

  • Ms. Phyllis Turner-Brim, Chief Intellectual Property Counsel, Intellectual Ventures
  • Prof. Doug Melamed, Visiting Professor, Stanford Law School
  • Prof. Michael Meurer, Boston University School of Law
  • Mr. Adam Mortara, Partner, Bartlit Beck Herman Palenchar & Scott LLP
  • Moderator: Hon. Danny J. Boggs, U.S. Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit

This program was presented on February 21, 2015, as part of the 2015 Federalist Society National Student Symposium.