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Detained Suspected Terrorists: Try in Military Courts or Civilian Courts? - Event Audio/Video

2014 Annual Student Symposium

Detained Suspected Terrorists: Try in Military Courts or Civilian Courts? - Event Audio/VideoThis panel will address the ongoing debate regarding trying, convicting and punishing suspected terrorists. Should military tribunals be abandoned in favor of trying individuals in Article III courts? A mere seven individuals held in Guantanamo Bay have been tried and convicted by military commissions, while DOJ reports that more than 500 individuals have been convicted of terrorism related offenses. What has prevented the trial of suspected terrorists held in Guantanamo Bay? Should military commissions for suspected terrorists and other enemies be abandoned or do they serve a valuable function?

The University of Florida Student Chapter hosted this panel discussion during the 2014 Annual Student Symposium on Saturday, March 8, 2014.

Panel 2: “DETAINED SUSPECTED TERRORISTS: TRY IN MILITARY COURTS OR CIVILIAN COURTS?”
1:45 – 3:30 p.m.
J. Wayne Reitz Union

  • Prof. Laura Donohue, Professor of Law Georgetown University Law Center
  • Prof. Christopher Jenks, Director of the Criminal Justice Clinic and Assistant Professor of Law, Southern Methodist University Dedman School of Law
  • Prof. Peter S. Margulies, Professor of Law, Roger Williams University School of Law
  • Prof. Deborah Pearlstein, Assistant Professor of Law, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law
  • Moderator: Hon. A. Raymond Randolph, U.S. Court of Appeals, DC Circuit

University of Florida Levin College of Law
Gainesville, FL

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