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King v. Burwell: U.S. Supreme Court Preview of the Next Challenge to the Affordable Care Act - Event Audio/Video

Federalism & Separation of Powers Practice Group
Jonathan H. Adler, Simon Lazarus, Carrie Severino, Robert N. Weiner, Robert Barnes, Dean A. Reuter February 26, 2015

On March 4, 2015 the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on King v. Burwell. The Federalist Society proudly hosts a panel discussion ahead of the oral arguments. King v. Burwell focuses on whether the Internal Revenue Service may permissibly promulgate regulations to extend tax-credit subsidies to coverage purchased through exchanges established by the federal government under Section 1321 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Jonathan H. Adler, Johan Verheij Memorial Professor of Law; Director, Center for Business Law and Regulation, Case Western Reserve University School of Law
  • Mr. Simon Lazarus, Senior Counsel, Constitutional Accountability Center
  • Ms. Carrie Severino, Chief Counsel and Policy Director, Judicial Crisis Network
  • Mr. Robert N. Weiner, Arnold & Porter LLP
  • Moderator: Mr. Robert Barnes, Reporter, The Washington Post
  • Introduction: Mr. Dean A. Reuter, Vice President & Director of Practice Groups, The Federalist Society

National Press Club
Washington, DC

The Future of Media: Is Government Regulation In Today's Media Landscape "Over-The-Top"? - Event Audio/Video

The Future of Media
Jeffrey Blum, Rick Kaplan, Barry Ohlson, Ryan Radia, Patricia J. Paoletta February 26, 2015

The Federalist Society's Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group and its George Washington University Law School Student Chapter co-sponsored a conference on the Future of Media -- examining the government's role in light of today's rapidly evolving media landscape. The conference took place at The George Washington University Law School on February 25, 2015.

Panel Presentation
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

  • Jeffrey H. Blum, Senior Vice President and Deputy General Counsel, DISH Network Corporation
  • Rick Kaplan, General Counsel and Executive Vice President of Legal Affairs, National Association of Broadcasters
  • Barry J. Ohlson, Vice President, Regulatory Affairs, Cox Enterprises
  • Ryan Radia, Associate Director of Technology Studies, Competitive Enterprise Institute
  • Moderator: Patricia J. Paoletta, Partner, Harris, Wiltshire & Grannis LLP

The George Washington University Law School
Washington, DC

Address by FTC Commissioner Joshua D. Wright - Event Audio/Video

The Future of Media
Joshua D. Wright, Anthony Glosson, Bryan N. Tramont February 26, 2015

The Federalist Society's Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group and its George Washington University Law School Student Chapter co-sponsored a conference on the Future of Media -- examining the government's role in light of today's rapidly evolving media landscape. The conference took place at The George Washington University Law School on February 25, 2015.

Keynote Address
12:30 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

  • Introduction: Mr. Bryan N. Tramont, Wilkinson Barker Knauer, LLP and Chairman, Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group
  • Introduction: Mr. Anthony Glosson, Student Member, Telecommunications & Electronic Media Practice Group and Editor-in-Chief, Federal Communications Law Journal
  • Hon. Joshua D. Wright, Commissioner, Federal Trade Commission

The George Washington University Law School
Washington, DC

Executive Action on Immigration - Event Audio/Video

Sponsored by the Federalist Society's Practice Groups
Kamal Essaheb, David B. Rivkin, Jr., Ilya Shapiro, Peter Bisbee February 20, 2015

On November 20, 2014, President Obama, with much attention from the media and the public, announced executive action on immigration. Our discussion will address the specifics of the President’s actions, and the legality of those actions. What exactly was said and done by the President, and how do his actions differ from acts he previously asserted were beyond his unilateral power? Has the President exceeded his constitutional authority to act? What happens next? Please join us over the lunch hour for a discussion with three experts in the field.

Featuring:

  • Mr. Kamal Essaheb, Immigration Policy Attorney, National Immigration Law Center
  • Mr. David Rivkin, Partner, Baker & Hostetler LLP
  • Mr. Ilya Shapiro, Senior Fellow in Constitutional Studies, Cato Institute
  • Moderator: Mr. Peter Bisbee, Membership Director and Associate Director of External Relations, The Federalist Society

National Press Club
Washington, DC

Animal Personhood: A Debate - Event Audio/Video

Sponsored by the Federalist Society's Practice Groups
Richard L. Cupp, Steven M. Wise, A. Raymond Randolph February 19, 2015

The Federalist Society does not authorize the use or transcription of these recordings, in part or in whole, by any person or organization for any use other than for the private viewing of the recorded event.

Some animal rights activists have maintained for years that animals deserve many of the same basic legal rights that humans have. Though “animal personhood” might be perceived as a niche issue, the legal status of animals such as apes, dolphins, elephants and whales reaches far beyond the realm of animal rights—to the food, pharmaceutical, tourism and entertainment industries and more. Recently, animal rights supporters have begun turning to the legal system for help. In late 2013, the animal rights organization Nonhuman Rights Project filed lawsuits in New York State to establish the “legal personhood” of four chimpanzees and relocate them to outdoor sanctuaries. While intermediate appellate courts have rejected the Nonhuman Rights Project’s argument, the group has publicly stated its intention to appeal to the Court of Appeals, New York State’s highest court.

These lawsuits were the first in the United States to seek limited personhood rights for animals with advanced cognitive abilities. At the core of the lawsuits are fundamental questions about the legal status of animals. Is the concept of animal rights more about the restriction of human activity, or about truly granting rights to animals? Do current animal welfare laws provide sufficient protections to animals? Should animals have the ability to challenge their own detention, though the writ of habeas corpus?

Featuring:

  • Prof. Richard L. Cupp, John W. Wade Professor of Law, Pepperdine University School of Law
  • Mr. Steven M. Wise, President, Nonhuman Rights Project, Inc.
  • Moderator: Hon. A. Raymond Randolph, United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit

National Press Club
Washington, DC