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Article I Initiative

Welcome to the Article I Initiative

A properly functioning legislature is imperative to maintaining a democratic-republic. In many ways, our modern Congresses have failed to live up to their constitutionally designated role. Public regard for the institution has never been lower; Americans increasingly perceive their leaders as loyal to party over country. Congress seems unable or unwilling to stand up to the other branches and work to address the nation’s major challenges.

The mission of Federalist Society’s Article I Initiative is to restore Congress to its rightful place in the Constitutional order. The Initiative is non-partisan; we aim to bring the left and the right together to ensure that the Constitutional balance leans heavily towards the institution which is meant to be most representative of the American people.

From this page, you will have access to Article I Initiative content, including videos, podcasts, articles, and blog posts. Sign-up for updates here, and message us directly if you have any questions or comments.

If you have any questions, please email us at ArticleI@fed-soc.org.


 
 


Recent Updates

Is Congress Afraid of Power?

Short video featuring Adam White
Adam J. White July 26, 2017

Is the modern Congress doing more harm than good? Adam White of the Hoover Institution summarizes his remarks from a panel on congressional power at the 2017 Executive Branch Review Conference.

The Constitutional War Powers of the Executive and Legislative Branches - Event Audio/Video

Article I Initiative
Mickey Edwards, Andrew C. McCarthy, Nathan Kaczmarek July 13, 2017

What kind of war power does the Constitution grant the President and Congress? What limitations apply to each branch concerning the power to declare war and the use of military force? Over time, how has the Framers’ understanding been followed and in what ways has it been ignored? Do the founding principles regarding these topics still have application to our modern era? Former Congressman Mickey Edwards and National Review Institute Senior Fellow Andrew C. McCarthy joined us for an insightful discussion of these and other topics.

This event was held on July 7, 2017, at the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington, DC.

Featuring:

  • Hon. Mickey Edwards, Former Congressman, Vice President and Program Director, Rodel Fellowships In Public Leadership, Aspen Institute
  • Andrew C. McCarthy, Senior Fellow, National Review Institute
  • Moderator: Nate Kaczmarek, Deputy Director, Article I Initiative, The Federalist Society

Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC

The Constitutional War Powers of the Executive and Legislative Branches

Article I Initiative
Mickey Edwards, Julian Ku, Andrew C. McCarthy July 07, 2017

What kind of war power does the Constitution grant the President and Congress? What limitations apply to each branch concerning the power to declare war and the use of military force? Over time, how has the Framers’ understanding been followed and in what ways has it been ignored? Do the founding principles regarding these topics still have application to our modern era? Join us for an insightful discussion with Former Congressman Mickey Edwards, Hofstra Constitutional Law Professor Julian Ku,  and National Review Institute Senior Fellow Andrew C. McCarthy.   

Featuring:

  • Honorable Mickey Edwards, Former Congressman, Vice President and Program Director, Rodel Fellowships In Public Leadership, Aspen Institute
  • Professor Julian Ku, Maurice A. Deane Distinguished Professor of Constitutional Law, Faculty Director of International Programs and Hofstra Research Fellow
  • Andrew C. McCarthy, Senior Fellow, National Review Institute

The Wealth of Congress

Jonathan Klick June 14, 2017
Article I Initiative

Professor Jonathan Klick’s paper is an empirical inquiry into the impact of congressional service on the personal wealth of those elected. Professor Klick tackles the question “Does working in Congress help one become rich?” Among other factors, he examines insider trading among members, financial behavior upon leaving office, the correlation of committee assignments and wealth accumulation. While acknowledging the difficulty of making causal inferences due to incomplete disclosure data, Professor Klick interprets his results as evidence that House members are indeed getting richer.