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Former United States Attorney General Meese on Voter ID Laws

Civil Rights and Free Speech & Election Law Practice Group Teleforum
Edwin Meese III January 29, 2015

Numerous states have passed voter identification laws, and the Supreme Court has permitted them to remain in effect. Nonetheless, voter ID remains a highly controversial issue. Former United States Attorney General Edwin Meese III will discuss voter fraud and the importance of voter ID laws and answer audience questions on a live Teleforum conference call.

  • Hon. Edwin Meese III, Ronald Reagan Distinguished Fellow in Public Policy, The Heritage Foundation

Disparate Impact Liability and the Fair Housing Act: Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc. - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Todd F. Gaziano January 22, 2015

On Wednesday, January 21, 2015, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project Inc. The Supreme Court has previously attempted twice to hear cases reaching the question of whether disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act, in Magner v. Gallagher and Mount Holly v. Mount Holly Gardens Citizens in Action, and in both instances the cases were settled less than a month before oral arguments. The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to “refuse to sell or rent . . . or to refuse to negotiate for the sale or rental of, or otherwise make unavailable or deny, a dwelling to any person because of race.” Do policies that can be demonstrated to have a discriminatory effect on certain racial groups, without a showing of discriminatory intent, violate the statute?

  • Hon. Todd F. Gaziano, Executive Director, Washington, D.C. Center and Senior Fellow in Constitutional Law, Pacific Legal Foundation

Disparate Impact Liability and the Fair Housing Act: Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project Inc.

Civil Rights Practice Group Courthouse Steps Teleforum
Todd F. Gaziano January 21, 2015

On Wednesday, January 21, 2015, the Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project Inc. The Supreme Court has previously attempted twice to hear cases reaching the question of whether disparate impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act, in Magner v. Gallagher and Mount Holly v. Mount Holly Gardens Citizens in Action, and in both instances the cases were settled less than a month before oral arguments. The Fair Housing Act makes it illegal to “refuse to sell or rent . . . or to refuse to negotiate for the sale or rental of, or otherwise make unavailable or deny, a dwelling to any person because of race.” Do policies that can be demonstrated to have a discriminatory effect on certain racial groups, without a showing of discriminatory intent, violate the statute?

  • Hon. Todd F. Gaziano, Executive Director, Washington, D.C. Center and Senior Fellow in Constitutional Law, Pacific Legal Foundation

Coming Soon to a School Near You?: Common Core - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Jimmy R. Faircloth, D. John Sauer January 12, 2015

The Common Core State Standards attempts to define what K-12 students should know at the end of each school year in key subject areas. The initiative garnered strong and broad support, but has come under increasingly heavy criticism from state and local officials, and parents. Supporters argue that uniform standards are an essential part of assuring quality education throughout the nation. Criticisms range from concerns about top-down, federal control of a traditionally state and local government function, to attempts to impose a nationwide curriculum, to a lack of field testing of the standards. Our experts discussed the standards and who has the better argument.

  • Jimmy R. Faircloth, Jr., Managing Partner, Faircloth, Melton & Keiser, LLC
  • D. John Sauer, Partner, Clark & Sauer, LLC

Coming Soon to a School Near You?: Common Core

Civil Rights Practice Group Teleforum
Jimmy R. Faircloth, D. John Sauer January 09, 2015

The Common Core State Standards attempts to define what K-12 students should know at the end of each school year in key subject areas. The initiative garnered strong and broad support, but has come under increasingly heavy criticism from state and local officials, and parents. Supporters argue that uniform standards are an essential part of assuring quality education throughout the nation. Criticisms range from concerns about top-down, federal control of a traditionally state and local government function, to attempts to impose a nationwide curriculum, to a lack of field testing of the standards. Our experts will discuss the standards and who has the better argument.

  • Jimmy R. Faircloth, Jr., Managing Partner, Faircloth, Melton & Keiser, LLC
  • D. John Sauer, Partner, Clark & Sauer, LLC

College Admissions and Affirmative Action - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Edward Blum, William Consovoy January 09, 2015

The battle over the use of affirmative action in college admissions seems far from over, as the recent filing of two federal lawsuits demonstrates. The Project for Fair Representation recently sued both Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for allegedly capping the number of Asian-Americans they admit and using racial classifications to engage in invidious discrimination. Edward Blum and William Consovoy provided a litigation update on these and other cases.

  • Edward Blum, Director, The Project on Fair Representation
  • William Consovoy, Partner, Consovoy McCarthy PLLC

College Admissions and Affirmative Action

Civil Rights Practice Group Teleforum
Edward Blum, William Consovoy January 08, 2015

The battle over the use of affirmative action in college admissions seems far from over, as the recent filing of two federal lawsuits demonstrates. The Project for Fair Representation recently sued both Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for allegedly capping the number of Asian-Americans they admit and using racial classifications to engage in invidious discrimination. Edward Blum and William Consovoy will provide a litigation update on these and other cases.

  • Edward Blum, Director, The Project on Fair Representation
  • William Consovoy, Partner, Consovoy McCarthy PLLC

Is the Akaka Bill Back? - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Hans A. von Spakovsky December 17, 2014

The Akaka Bill, originally proposed by former U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka, was designed to establish a process for Native Hawaiians to gain federal recognition similar to that of some Native American tribes. Based on this status, members can then receive preferential treatment. Critics argue that such treatment would violate the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Supporters argue that such preferences would be authorized because they would be on the political relationship that existed between the U.S. government and its native peoples, and based on the pre-existing sovereignty of those native peoples. Will the Akaka Bill, or some version of it, resurface? If so, is it good law? Good policy?

  • Hans A. von Spakovsky, Manager, Election Law Reform Initiative and Senior Legal Fellow, Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, The Heritage Foundation

Is the Akaka Bill Back?

Civil Rights Practice Group Teleforum
Hans A. von Spakovsky December 10, 2014

The Akaka Bill, originally proposed by former U.S. Senator Daniel Akaka, was designed to establish a process for Native Hawaiians to gain federal recognition similar to that of some Native American tribes. Based on this status, members can then receive preferential treatment. Critics argue that such treatment would violate the Equal Protection Clause of the U.S. Constitution. Supporters argue that such preferences would be authorized because they would be on the political relationship that existed between the U.S. government and its native peoples, and based on the pre-existing sovereignty of those native peoples. Will the Akaka Bill, or some version of it, resurface? If so, is it good law? Good policy?

  • Hans A. von Spakovsky, Manager, Election Law Reform Initiative and Senior Legal Fellow, Edwin Meese III Center for Legal and Judicial Studies, The Heritage Foundation

Magna Carta: Muse & Mentor

Short Video about the Magna Carta: Muse & Mentor Exhibition
December 05, 2014

The Library of Congress celebrates the 800th anniversary of the first issue of Magna Carta with a 10-week exhibition, with the 1215 Lincoln Cathedral Magna Carta as its centerpiece. The Federalist Society is cosponsoring the exhibit. Click HERE for more information.