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2016 National Lawyers Convention

The Jurisprudence and Legacy of Justice Scalia
November 17, 2016

The 2016 National Lawyers Convention is scheduled for Thursday, November 17 through Saturday, November 19 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. The topic of this year's convention is: The Jurisprudence and Legacy of Justice Scalia. Registration is now open!

Supreme Court Preview: What Is in Store for October Term 2016? - Event Audio/Video

Co-Sponsored by the Faculty Division and the Practice Groups
Thomas C. Goldstein, Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, Carrie Severino, George J. Terwilliger, Robert Barnes September 28, 2016

October 4th will mark the first day of oral arguments for the 2016 Supreme Court term. The Court's docket already includes major cases involving insider trading, the Fourth Amendment, the Sixth Amendment, the Eighth Amendment, criminal law, IP and patent law, the Free Exercise and Equal Protection Clauses, the Fair Housing Act, and voting rights.

The full list of cases granted thus far for the upcoming term can be viewed on SCOTUSblog here. The panelists will also discuss the current composition and the future of the Court.

This event was held on September 27, 2016, at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

Featuring:

  • Mr. Thomas C. Goldstein, Goldstein & Russell PC
  • Prof. Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, Georgetown Law Center
  • Ms. Carrie Severino, Judicial Crisis Network
  • Hon. George J. Terwilliger, McGuireWoods LLP
  • Moderator: Mr. Robert Barnes, The Washington Post

National Press Club
Washington, DC

Supreme Court Preview: What Is in Store for October Term 2016?

Co-Sponsored by the Faculty Division and the Practice Groups
Robert Barnes, Thomas C. Goldstein, Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, Carrie Severino, George J. Terwilliger September 27, 2016


This event is being livestreamed.

October 4th will mark the first day of oral arguments for the 2016 Supreme Court term. The Court's docket already includes major cases involving insider trading, the Fourth Amendment, the Sixth Amendment, the Eighth Amendment, criminal law, IP and patent law, the Free Exercise and Equal Protection Clauses, the Fair Housing Act, and voting rights.

The full list of cases granted thus far for the upcoming term can be viewed on SCOTUSblog here. The panelists will also discuss the current composition and the future of the Court.

Featuring:

  • Mr. Thomas C. Goldstein, Goldstein & Russell PC
  • Prof. Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, Georgetown Law Center
  • Ms. Carrie Severino, Judicial Crisis Network
  • Hon. George J. Terwilliger, McGuireWoods LLP
  • Moderator: Mr. Robert Barnes, The Washington Post
     

Court Rulings on Election Law - Podcast

Civil Rights and Free Speech & Election Law Practice Groups Teleforum
Hans A. von Spakovsky August 10, 2016

There have been a series of recent court decisions at both the federal district court and court of appeals level involving election reforms in North Carolina, North Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin. These cases involve state statutes on voter ID, early voting, same day registration, and out-of-precinct voting. Hans von Spakovsky, Manager of the Election Law Reform Initiative at the Heritage Foundation, a former Commissioner on the Federal Election Commissioner, and the former Counsel to the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights at the U.S. Justice Department will discuss these developments and the status of the litigation and the law governing elections and voting.

Featuring:

  • Hans A. von Spakovsky, Manager, Election Law Reform Initiative and Senior Legal Fellow, The Heritage Foundation

Federalist Society Review, Volume 17, Issue 2

Katie McClendon August 10, 2016

We are pleased to bring you the latest issue of the Federalist Society Review. The Federalist Society Review is the legal journal produced by the Federalist Society’s Practice Groups. The Review was formerly known as Engage, and although the name has changed, it still features top-notch scholarship on important legal and public policy issues from some of the best legal minds in the country.

The Review is published three times a year, thanks to the hard work of our fifteen Practice Group Executive Committees and authors who volunteer their time and expertise. The Review seeks to contribute to the marketplace of ideas in a way that is collegial, accessible, intelligent, and original. Articles and full issues are available on our website and through the Westlaw database. 

We hope that readers enjoy the articles and come away with new information and fresh insights. Please send us any suggestions and responses at info@fedsoc.org.

[Read Now]

Court Rulings on Election Law

Civil Rights and Free Speech & Election Law Practice Groups Teleforum
Hans A. von Spakovsky August 09, 2016

There have been a series of recent court decisions at both the federal district court and court of appeals level involving election reforms in North Carolina, North Dakota, Texas and Wisconsin. These cases involve state statutes on voter ID, early voting, same day registration, and out-of-precinct voting. Hans von Spakovsky, Manager of the Election Law Reform Initiative at the Heritage Foundation, a former Commissioner on the Federal Election Commissioner, and the former Counsel to the Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights at the U.S. Justice Department will discuss these developments and the status of the litigation and the law governing elections and voting.

Featuring:

  • Hans A. von Spakovsky, Manager, Election Law Reform Initiative and Senior Legal Fellow, The Heritage Foundation

Protecting Eligible Voters: Evenwel v. Abbott and the Future of Redistricting - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
J. Michael Connolly, Ilya Shapiro August 05, 2016

In Evenwel v. Abbott, the Supreme Court held that the Constitution’s one-person, one-vote rule allows States to draw their legislative districts based on total population. In doing so, the Court rejected the appellants’ argument that the one-person, one-vote rule protects eligible voters and thus required States to equalize the population of eligible voters, not total population. The Court explicitly declined to resolve whether States may draw districts to equalize voter-eligible population rather than total population.

Our experts analyzed the Supreme Court’s decision and reviewed the constitutional history underlying the one-person, one-vote doctrine. They discussed the impact of Evenwel on future redistricting decisions, including the Court’s willingness to accept legislative districts based on eligible voters.

Featuring:

  • J. Michael Connolly, Counsel, Consovoy McCarthy Park PLLC
  • Ilya Shapiro, Senior Fellow in Constitutional Studies, Cato Institute

Title IX & Transgender Bathrooms in Public Schools

Short video featuring Roger Severino
Roger Severino August 05, 2016

Roger Severino oversees the DeVos Center for Religion and Civil Society at the Heritage Foundation, where he focuses on religious liberty, marriage, and life issues. In this video, Severino comments on a joint guidance from the U.S. Department of Justice and the U.S. Department of Education on how schools should apply Title IX to the bathroom choices of transgender students.

Protecting Eligible Voters: Evenwel v. Abbott and the Future of Redistricting

Civil Rights Practice Group Teleforum
J. Michael Connolly, Ilya Shapiro July 28, 2016

In Evenwel v. Abbott, the Supreme Court held that the Constitution’s one-person, one-vote rule allows States to draw their legislative districts based on total population. In doing so, the Court rejected the appellants’ argument that the one-person, one-vote rule protects eligible voters and thus required States to equalize the population of eligible voters, not total population. The Court explicitly declined to resolve whether States may draw districts to equalize voter-eligible population rather than total population.

Our experts will analyze the Supreme Court’s decision and review the constitutional history underlying the one-person, one-vote doctrine. They will discuss the impact of Evenwel on future redistricting decisions, including the Court’s willingness to accept legislative districts based on eligible voters.

Featuring:

  • J. Michael Connolly, Counsel, Consovoy McCarthy Park PLLC
  • Ilya Shapiro, Senior Fellow in Constitutional Studies, Cato Institute