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Fourth Annual Executive Branch Review Conference

Law & Innovation
May 17, 2016

The Fourth Annual Executive Branch Review Conference will be held on Tuesday, May 17, 2016, at The Mayflower Hotel in Washington, DC. The theme of the conference is "Law & Innovation". There is no cost to attend the conference. [Register now!]

Packing Districts?: Supreme Court Decides Harris v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Hans A. von Spakovsky April 22, 2016

On April 20, the United States Supreme Court issued a unanimous opinion in Harris v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, a case challenging Arizona's state legislative district map as partisan gerrymandering. Our expert discussed the opinion and what it means for the Court’s voting rights jurisprudence.

Featuring:

  • Hon. Hans A. von Spakovsky, Manager, Election Law Reform Initiative and Senior Legal Fellow, The Heritage Foundation

Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Peter N. Kirsanow, Stanley Kurtz April 21, 2016

In July of 2015, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced its final rule on Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing. HUD touts the rule, promulgated under the Fair Housing Act of 1928, as a critical tool to help communities “take significant actions to overcome historic patterns of segregation, achieve truly balanced and integrated living patterns, promote fair housing choice, and foster inclusive communities that are free from discrimination.” Critics charge that the program is a power grab that improperly applies disparate impact analysis and incorrectly views geographic clustering of racial and ethnic minorities as evidence of discrimination and segregation. Our experts discussed the merits of the rule from both law and policy perspectives.

Featuring:

  • Hon. Peter N. Kirsanow, Commissioner, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights
  • Stanley Kurtz, Senior Fellow, Ethics and Public Policy Center

Packing Districts?: Supreme Court Decides Harris v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission

Civil Rights Practice Group Courthouse Steps Podcast
Hans A. von Spakovsky April 21, 2016

On April 20, the United States Supreme Court issued a unanimous opinion in Harris v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission, a case challenging Arizona's state legislative district map as partisan gerrymandering. Our expert will discuss the opinion and what it means for the Court’s voting rights jurisprudence.

Featuring:

  • Hon. Hans A. von Spakovsky, Manager, Election Law Reform Initiative and Senior Legal Fellow, The Heritage Foundation

Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Peter N. Kirsanow, Stanley Kurtz April 20, 2016

In July of 2015, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) announced its final rule on Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing. HUD touts the rule, promulgated under the Fair Housing Act of 1928, as a critical tool to help communities “take significant actions to overcome historic patterns of segregation, achieve truly balanced and integrated living patterns, promote fair housing choice, and foster inclusive communities that are free from discrimination.” Critics charge that the program is a power grab that improperly applies disparate impact analysis and incorrectly views geographic clustering of racial and ethnic minorities as evidence of discrimination and segregation. Our experts will discuss the merits of the rule from both law and policy perspectives.

Featuring:

  • Hon. Peter N. Kirsanow, Commissioner, U.S. Commission on Civil Rights
  • Stanley Kurtz, Senior Fellow, Ethics and Public Policy Center

A Stunning Development in Second Amendment Jurisprudence?: Caetano v. Massachusetts - Podcast

Civil Rights Practice Group Podcast
Nelson Lund April 14, 2016

In a per curiam opinion issued on March 21, 2016, the Supreme Court vacated and remanded a decision by the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts upholding a state law prohibiting the possession of stun guns, finding that the decision was inconsistent with Supreme Court precedent in District of Columbia v. Heller and McDonald v. Chicago. Justices Alito and Thomas issued a concurring opinion which would have gone further in finding the Massachusetts statute unconstitutional. Our expert discussed the case and its implications for the Court’s Second Amendment jurisprudence going forward.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Nelson Lund, University Professor, George Mason University School of Law

Political Correctness on Campus - Event Audio/Video

Stanford Intellectual Diversity Conference
Pamela S. Karlan, Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, Richard H. Sander, Zachary Price April 13, 2016

Political correctness in the classroom can be seen as a consequence of a lack of political diversity in the university. How does political correctness affect research, and teaching? Is political correctness all that bad, or does it have a proper place in academia? Professors Pam Karlan, Richard Sander, and Nicholas Rosenkranz discuss.

This panel was presented at the Stanford Intellectual Diversity Conference on Friday, April 8, 2016, at Stanford Law School.

Political Correctness on Campus

  • Prof. Pamela S. Karlan, Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law and Co-Director, Supreme Court Litigation Clinic, Stanford Law School
  • Prof. Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz, Professor of Law, Georgetown University Law Center
  • Prof. Richard H. Sander, Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law
  • Moderator: Prof. Zachary Price, Associate Professor of Law, UC Hastings College of the Law

Stanford Law School
Stanford, CA

A Conversation on Intellectual Diversity - Event Audio/Video

Stanford Intellectual Diversity Conference
Larry Kramer, Michael W. McConnell, Bernadette Meyler, Michael Rubin April 13, 2016

Why make a big deal out of intellectual diversity in academia, anyway? What are its advantages? What are its disadvantages? Is it a goal worth pursuing at the expense of others? Dean Larry Kramer and Professor Michael McConnell debate these points and others.

This panel was presented at the Stanford Intellectual Diversity Conference on Friday, April 8, 2016, at Stanford Law School.

Keynote Conversation

  • Dean Larry Kramer, President, The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; Lecturer in Law and Former Dean, Stanford Law School
  • Prof. Michael McConnell, Richard and Frances Mallery Professor and Director, Constitutional Law Center, Stanford Law School
  • Moderator: Prof. Bernadette Meyler, Carl and Shelia Spaeth Professor of Law, Stanford Law School
  • Introduction: Mr. Michael Rubin, Co-President, Stanford Student Chapter

Stanford Law School
Stanford, CA

Student Perspectives on Intellectual Diversity in Academia - Event Audio/Video

Stanford Intellectual Diversity Conference
R. Sohan Dasgupta, Roland Nadler, Ilan Wurman, Jud Campbell, Jonathan Mondel April 13, 2016

The proper education of America’s youth is arguably the most important social responsibility the university has. But does a lack of intellectual diversity in school create pedagogical issues? Our panel of current and former law students weighs in.

This panel was presented at the Stanford Intellectual Diversity Conference on Friday, April 8, 2016, at Stanford Law School.

Student Perspectives on Intellectual Diversity in Academia

  • Dr. R. Sohan Dasgupta, University of California, Berkeley
  • Mr. Roland Nadler, Fellow, Center for Law and Biosciences, Stanford Law School
  • Mr. Ilan Wurman, Associate, Winston & Strawn LLP
  • Moderator: Mr. Jud Campbell, Executive Director and Research Fellow, Constitutional Law Center, Stanford Law School
  • Introduction: Mr. Jonathan Mondel, Co-President, Stanford Student Chapter

Stanford Law School
Stanford, CA

Recent Research in Intellectual Diversity - Event Audio/Video

Stanford Intellectual Diversity Conference
M. Elizabeth Magill, Eugene B. Meyer, James Lindgren, James C. Phillips, Jon A. Shields, G. Marcus Cole, Jonathan Mondel, Michael Rubin April 13, 2016

To foster meaningful discourse on intellectual diversity in academia, it is important to begin with the facts. Is there a lack of intellectual diversity in academia? How big is the problem? Professors Jim Lindgren, James Phillips, and Jon Shields review some of the latest research on the subject.

This panel was presented at the Stanford Intellectual Diversity Conference on Friday, April 8, 2016, at Stanford Law School.

Opening Remarks

  • Dean M. Elizabeth Magill, Richard E. Lang Professor of Law and Dean, Stanford Law School
  • Mr. Eugene B. Meyer, President, The Federalist Society
  • Introduction: Mr. Jonathan Mondel, Co-President, Stanford Student Chapter
  • Introduction: Mr. Michael Rubin, Co-President, Stanford Student Chapter

Recent Research in Intellectual Diversity

  • Prof. James T. Lindgren, Professor of Law, Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law
  • Prof. James C. Phillips, Former Visiting Professor, BYU Law School
  • Dr. Jon A. Shields, Associate Professor, Claremont McKenna College
  • Moderator: Prof. G. Marcus Cole, William F. Baxter-Visa International Professor of Law, Stanford Law School

Stanford Law School
Stanford, CA