The Federalist Society

Miranda & Terror Suspects - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast

February 4, 2011

Paul G. Cassell, Amos N. Guiora, Richard D. Klingler

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  Miranda & Terror Suspects - MP3
Running Time: 00:46:00

PDF Slide Presentation by Paul G. Cassell

 

Practice Groups PodcastsTo what extent are law enforcement personnel required to read the standard Miranda warning to terror suspects?  Does the reading of such a warning so compromise the government's ability to investigate acts of terror, both prospectively and retrospectively, that a public safety exception exists?  Or does such a public safety exception for terror suspects effectively erode a vital protection for all criminal suspects?

Featuring:

  • Hon. Paul G. Cassell, Ronald N. Boyce Presidential Professor of Criminal Law, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law
  • Prof. Amos N. Guiora, Professor of Law, The University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law
  • Moderator: Mr. Richard D. Klingler, Partner, Sidley Austin LLP

 

 

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Related Links

"Holder Backs a Miranda Limit for Terror Suspects," by Charlie Savage, The New York Times, May 9, 2010
"You Have the Right to Remain Constitutional," by Touro College Jacob D. Fuchsberg Law Center Professor and former New York State Court of Appeals Chief Judge Sol Wachtler, The New York Times, May 12, 2010
"Should Terror Suspects Be Read Miranda Rights?," by Ailsa Chang, WNYC News, Thursday, May 13, 2010
“Miranda Rights for Terrorists,” by Stephen F. Hayes, Senior Writer, The Weekly Standard, June 10, 2010
“Miranda Warnings for Terrorists -- Thank Sen. McCain,” by Andrew C. McCarthy, Senior Fellow, National Review Institute, National Review Online, June 10, 2010
"Rights Are Curtailed for Terror Suspects" by Evan Perez, The Wall Street Journal, March 24, 2011


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