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Does the Government's seizure of raisins violate the Takings Clause?

Short video with Ilya Somin discussing Horne v. USDA
Ilya Somin April 21, 2015

George Mason Law School Professor Ilya Somin previews an upcoming Supreme Court case in which Farmer Horne objects to an obscure government program stemming from 1930’s New Deal legislation in which raisin farmers are required to surrender a percentage of their crop to the Raisin Administrative Committee.  Petitioner and farmer Horne claims that being forced to turn over a percentage of his raisin crop to the government violates the Takings Clause of the 5th Amendment. The government asserts that the Takings Clause does not apply to personal property, and even if it did, that Horne is fairly compensated because his overall profits are increased.

Professor Somin co-signed the amicus brief of Constitutional and Property Law Scholars in support of petitioner.

As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

When is a law too vague to be Constitutional?

Short video with Ilya Shapiro discussing Johnson v. United States
Ilya Shapiro April 18, 2015

Senior fellow in constitutional studies at the Cato Institute and editor-in-chief of the Cato Supreme Court Review, Ilya Shapiro explains the confusion concerning what constitutes a violent felony conviction under the residual clause of the Armed Career Criminal Act. In this upcoming Supreme Court case, Petitioner Johnson claims the ACCA is unconstitutionally vague while the government asserts that Johnson’s conviction for possession of a short-barreled shotgun satisfies the violent felony requirement of the statute.

Ilya Shapiro is co-counsel on the amicus brief for the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, National Association of Federal Defenders, Families against Mandatory Minimums and the Cato Institute in support of the Petitioner.
 
As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

The Hijab Case

Short video with Rachel Paulose discussing EEOC v. Abercrombie
Rachel K. Paulose February 26, 2015

Former US Attorney for Minnesota, Rachel Paulose, explains the issues in dispute before the Supreme Court in EEOC v. Abercrombie in which a 17-year-old Muslim applicant alleges employment discrimination when Abercrombie refused to hire her as a "model" because of her religious head-covering.  Abercrombie denies the allegation.

As always, the Federalist Society takes no position on particular legal or public policy issues; all expressions of opinion are those of the speaker.

2015 Paul M. Bator Award: Prof. Joshua Kleinfeld

Joshua Kleinfeld February 23, 2015

The Paul M. Bator Award was established in 1989 in memory of Professor Paul M. Bator, a renowned scholar and teacher of federal courts and constitutional law at Harvard and the University of Chicago and Principal Deputy Solicitor General in the Reagan Administration. The award is given annually to a law professor under 40 who has demonstrated excellence in legal scholarship, a commitment to teaching, a concern for students, and who has made a significant public impact. This award is presented during the Federalist Society's Annual Student Symposium. On February 21, 2015, the Paul M. Bator Award was bestowed upon Prof. Joshua Kleinfeld, who has been teaching criminal law, international law, and legal theory at  Northwestern University School of Law since 2011.  Professor Kleinfeld was selected for the award on account of his scholarship, which is already making a mark on criminal law theory, his teaching, which according to Northwestern students who nominated him communicates an infectious passion for his subject, and the public impact he is having through his efforts to promote the rule of law across the globe.

Magna Carta: Muse & Mentor

Short Video about the Magna Carta: Muse & Mentor Exhibition
December 05, 2014

The Library of Congress celebrates the 800th anniversary of the first issue of Magna Carta with a 10-week exhibition, with the 1215 Lincoln Cathedral Magna Carta as its centerpiece. The Federalist Society is cosponsoring the exhibit. Click HERE for more information.