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2017 National Lawyers Convention

Administrative Agencies and the Regulatory State
November 16, 2017
red tape flag tilted

The 2017 National Lawyers Convention is scheduled for Thursday, November 16 through Saturday, November 18 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. The topic of this year's convention is: Administrative Agencies and the Regulatory State. More information will be posted soon!

The Authorization for the Use of Military Force: Is an Update Required?

International & National Security Law Practice Group Teleforum
Robert F. Turner, Stephen I. Vladeck September 28, 2017

The Authorization for the Use of Military Force was passed by Congress on September 14, 2001. This authorization is still used today to justify military actions taken by the Trump administration against ISIS and other terrorist organizations around the globe.

On September 15, the Senate rejected Sen. Rand Paul’s proposal to amend the Authorization that would have given it an expiration date of 6 months. Sen. Paul and others hoped that the deadline would force Congress to act and pass legislation to redefine executive and congressional war powers. Prof. Robert Turner and Prof. Steve Vladeck will join us to discuss the AUMF and its future.

Featuring:

  • Robert F. Turner, Professor, General Faculty Distinguished Fellow and Associate Director, Center for National Security Law
  • Prof. Stephen I. Vladeck, Professor of Law, The University of Texas at Austin School of Law

Supreme Court Preview: What Is in Store for October Term 2017?

Co-Sponsored by the Faculty Division and the Practice Groups
Jan Crawford, Kyle Duncan, Samuel Estreicher, Orin S. Kerr, Andrew J. Pincus, Carrie Severino September 27, 2017

This event is being live-streamed.

October 2nd will mark the first day of oral arguments for the 2017 Supreme Court term. The Court's docket already includes major cases involving Federal Courts, redistricting, the First Amendment, election law, business law, class actions, international and immigration issues, Alien Tort Statute, and the Fourth Amendment.

The full list of cases granted thus far for the upcoming term can be viewed on SCOTUSblog here. The panelists will also discuss the current composition and the future of the Court.

Featuring:

  • Kyle Duncan, Schaerr Duncan, LLP
  • Prof. Samuel Estreicher, New York University School of Law
  • Prof. Orin Kerr, George Washington University Law School
  • Andrew Pincus, Mayer Brown, LLP
  • Carrie Severino, Judicial Crisis Network
  • Moderator: Jan Crawford, CBS News

Striking Power

International & National Security Law Practice Group Teleforum
Jeremy A. Rabkin, John C. Yoo, Vincent J. Vitkowsky September 20, 2017

Threats to international peace and security include the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, rogue nations, and international terrorism. In Striking Power, Professor Jeremy Rabkin and Professor John Yoo argue that the United States must respond to these challenges to its national security and to world stability by embracing new military technologies such as drones, autonomous robots, and cyber weapons. These weapons can provide more precise, less destructive means to coerce opponents to stop WMD proliferation, clamp down on terrorism, or end humanitarian disasters. Efforts to constrain new military technologies are not only doomed, Rabkin and Yoo argue, but dangerous. Most weapons in themselves are not good or evil; their morality turns on the motives and purposes for the war itself. These new weapons can send a strong message without death or severe personal injury, and as a result can make war less, rather than more, destructive.

Join us as Vince Vitkowsky moderates a discussion with the authors of Striking Power about these issues and others.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Jeremy Rabkin, Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University 
  • Prof. John Yoo, Emanuel S. Heller Professor of Law, Co-Faculty Director, Korea Law Center
  • Moderator: Vincent J. Vitkowsky, Partner, Seiger Gfeller Laurie LLP 

The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East: Prevention, Prohibition, & Prosecution - Podcast

International & National Security Law & Religious Liberties Practice Group Podcast
Ronald J. Rychlak, Nina Shea August 24, 2017

Since the summer of 2014, ISIS has been waging a blitz through Iraq's Nineveh province, murdering and displacing Iraqi Christians and others. The European Union, Britain, and the U.S. have labeled the campaign to eradicate Christianity from Iraq as genocide. However many in the West, even Christians, remain unaware of the scale of this persecution, and even fewer know what can be done about it. The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East focuses on persecuted Christians, but its analysis applies equally to the other victims. In the United States, military and diplomatic responses are contemplated and sometimes undertaken. But what about the legal system? Are there things we can or should be trying? That question animates this book as it explores various facets of religious persecution.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Ronald J. Rychlak, Co-Editor & Contributor, The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East: Prevention, Prohibition, & Prosecution, Professor of Law, Jamie L. Whitten Chair of Law and Government, and Faculty Athletics Representative, University of Mississippi School of Law
  • Nina Shea, Director, Center for Religious Freedom, Hudson Institute, Former Commissioner on the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom

2017 Annual Supreme Court Round Up - Event Audio/Video

Washington, DC Lawyers Chapter
Miguel Estrada, Douglas R. Cox July 28, 2017

On July 13, 2017, Miguel Estrada of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP delivered the Annual Supreme Court Round Up at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

Featuring:

  • Mr. Miguel Estrada, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP
  • Introduction: Mr. Douglas R. Cox, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP

National Press Club
Washington, DC

Immigration Moratorium Back in the Court - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
Josh Blackman, Ilya Somin July 25, 2017

Eighteen days after the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project and stay applications were granted in part, on July 14, 2017, Judge Watson of the District Court of Hawaii ruled that grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, and other relatives of people could not be prevented from entering the country as they qualified as persons with a “bona fide relationship” under the Supreme Court ruling.

On July 19, 2017, the Supreme Court upheld parts of the District Court order. Ilya Somin and Josh Blackman joined us again to discuss developments in the litigation of Executive Order 13780.

Featuring: 

  • Prof. Josh Blackman, Associate Professor of Law, South Texas College of Law, Houston
  • Prof. Ilya Somin, Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University

 

Immigration Moratorium Back in the Court

International & National Security Law Practice Group Teleforum
Josh Blackman, Ilya Somin July 20, 2017

Eighteen days after the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Trump v. International Refugee Assistance Project and stay applications were granted in part, on July 14, Judge Watson of the District Court of Hawaii ruled that grandparents, grandchildren, aunts, uncles, and other relatives of people could not be prevented from entering the country as they qualified as persons with a “bona fide relationship” under the Supreme Court ruling.

Yesterday, the Supreme Court upheld parts of the District Court order. Ilya Somin and Josh Blackman will join us again to discuss the latest development in the litigation of Executive Order 13780.

  • Prof. Josh Blackman, Associate Professor of Law, South Texas College of Law, Houston
  • Prof. Ilya Somin, Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University

Reauthorization of Section 702 - Podcast

International & National Security Law Practice Group Podcast
Kate Martin, Karen J. Lugo, Adam Klein July 19, 2017

Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) is up for reauthorization in 2017. An earlier version of the program was instituted after 9/11 by President George W. Bush. In 2007, Congress adopted the Protect America Act and one year later passed the FISA Amendments Act, which included Section 702. Section 702 allows the government to target for surveillance non-U.S. citizens “reasonably believed to be located outside the United States to acquire foreign intelligence information.” The authorization does not extend to non-citizens outside the country to gain information on citizens or permanent residents believed to be residing in the United States.

While proponents of the law argue it is necessary for national security, critics claim that U.S. citizens are too often incidentally swept into surveillance due to the nature of the “targeting procedures” employed by intelligence agencies, and therefore reforms are needed to protect their privacy. Our experts discussed reauthorization, what it would mean if Congress chose not to act, and what kinds of reforms are under consideration.

.Featuring: 

  • Adam Klein, Senior Fellow, Center for a New American Security
  • Kate Martin, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress 
  • Moderator: Karen Lugo, Founder, Libertas-West Project

Reauthorization of Section 702

International & National Security Law Practice Group Teleforum
Adam Klein, Kate Martin, Karen J. Lugo July 17, 2017

Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) is up for reauthorization in 2017. An earlier version of the program was instituted after 9/11 by President George W. Bush. In 2007, Congress adopted the Protect America Act and one year later passed the FISA Amendments Act, which included Section 702. Section 702 allows the government to target for surveillance non-U.S. citizens “reasonably believed to be located outside the United States to acquire foreign intelligence information.” The authorization does not extend to non-citizens outside the country to gain information on citizens or permanent residents believed to be residing in the United States.

While proponents of the law argue it is necessary for national security, critics claim that U.S. citizens are too often incidentally swept into surveillance due to the nature of the “targeting procedures” employed by intelligence agencies, and therefore reforms are needed to protect their privacy. Join us as our experts discuss reauthorization, what it would mean if Congress chose not to act, and what kinds of reforms are under consideration.

.Featuring: 

  • Adam Klein, Senior Fellow, Center for a New American Security
  • Kate Martin, Senior Fellow, Center for American Progress 
  • Moderator: Karen Lugo, Founder, Libertas-West Project