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2017 National Lawyers Convention

Administrative Agencies and the Regulatory State
November 16, 2017
red tape flag tilted

The 2017 National Lawyers Convention is scheduled for Thursday, November 16 through Saturday, November 18 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. The topic of this year's convention is: Administrative Agencies and the Regulatory State. More information will be posted soon!

Supreme Court Preview: What Is in Store for October Term 2017?

Co-Sponsored by the Faculty Division and the Practice Groups
Jan Crawford, Kyle Duncan, Samuel Estreicher, Orin S. Kerr, Andrew J. Pincus, Carrie Severino September 27, 2017

This event is being live-streamed.

October 2nd will mark the first day of oral arguments for the 2017 Supreme Court term. The Court's docket already includes major cases involving Federal Courts, redistricting, the First Amendment, election law, business law, class actions, international and immigration issues, Alien Tort Statute, and the Fourth Amendment.

The full list of cases granted thus far for the upcoming term can be viewed on SCOTUSblog here. The panelists will also discuss the current composition and the future of the Court.

Featuring:

  • Kyle Duncan, Schaerr Duncan, LLP
  • Prof. Samuel Estreicher, New York University School of Law
  • Prof. Orin Kerr, George Washington University Law School
  • Andrew Pincus, Mayer Brown, LLP
  • Carrie Severino, Judicial Crisis Network
  • Moderator: Jan Crawford, CBS News

The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East: Prevention, Prohibition, & Prosecution - Podcast

International & National Security Law & Religious Liberties Practice Group Podcast
Ronald J. Rychlak, Nina Shea August 24, 2017

Since the summer of 2014, ISIS has been waging a blitz through Iraq's Nineveh province, murdering and displacing Iraqi Christians and others. The European Union, Britain, and the U.S. have labeled the campaign to eradicate Christianity from Iraq as genocide. However many in the West, even Christians, remain unaware of the scale of this persecution, and even fewer know what can be done about it. The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East focuses on persecuted Christians, but its analysis applies equally to the other victims. In the United States, military and diplomatic responses are contemplated and sometimes undertaken. But what about the legal system? Are there things we can or should be trying? That question animates this book as it explores various facets of religious persecution.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Ronald J. Rychlak, Co-Editor & Contributor, The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East: Prevention, Prohibition, & Prosecution, Professor of Law, Jamie L. Whitten Chair of Law and Government, and Faculty Athletics Representative, University of Mississippi School of Law
  • Nina Shea, Director, Center for Religious Freedom, Hudson Institute, Former Commissioner on the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom

The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East: Prevention, Prohibition, & Prosecution by Ronald J. Rychlak

International & National Security Law & Religious Liberties Practice Group Teleforum
Ronald J. Rychlak, Nina Shea August 16, 2017

Since the summer of 2014, ISIS has been waging a blitz through Iraq's Nineveh province, murdering and displacing Iraqi Christians and others. The European Union, Britain, and the U.S. have labeled the campaign to eradicate Christianity from Iraq as genocide. However many in the West, even Christians, remain unaware of the scale of this persecution, and even fewer know what can be done about it. The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East focuses on persecuted Christians, but its analysis applies equally to the other victims. In the United States, military and diplomatic responses are contemplated and sometimes undertaken. But what about the legal system? Are there things we can or should be trying? That question animates this book as it explores various facets of religious persecution.

Featuring:

  • Prof. Ronald J. Rychlak, Author, The Persecution and Genocide of Christians in the Middle East: Prevention, Prohibition, & Prosecution, Professor of Law, Jamie L. Whitten Chair of Law and Government, and Faculty Athletics Representative, University of Mississippi School of Law
  • Nina Shea, Director, Center for Religious Freedom, Hudson Institute

2017 Annual Supreme Court Round Up - Event Audio/Video

Washington, DC Lawyers Chapter
Miguel Estrada, Douglas R. Cox July 28, 2017

On July 13, 2017, Miguel Estrada of Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP delivered the Annual Supreme Court Round Up at the National Press Club in Washington, DC.

Featuring:

  • Mr. Miguel Estrada, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP
  • Introduction: Mr. Douglas R. Cox, Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP

National Press Club
Washington, DC

Courthouse Steps: Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Inc. v. Comer - Decided - Podcast

Religious Liberties Practice Group Podcast
David A. Cortman June 28, 2017

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) denied a Learning Center run by Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Inc. (Trinity) federal funding to refurbish children’s playgrounds on the grounds of religious affiliation. The DNR offers Playground Scrap Tire Surface Material Grants to organizations that qualify for resurfacing of playgrounds. Though the licensed pre- school Learning Center incorporates religious instruction into is curriculum, the school is open to all children. Trinity’s Learning Center was denied funding based on Article I, Section 7 of the Missouri Constitution; the section reads: “no money shall ever be taken from the public treasury, directly or indirectly, in aid of any church, section or denomination of religion.”

Trinity claimed that the DNR infringed upon their rights under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and the First Amendment’s protections of freedom of religion and speech. The district court dismissed Trinity’s allegations, claiming that Trinity failed to file a specific claim. Trinity responded by amending its complaint to an allegation that other religious institutions had previously received the DNR funding; nevertheless, the district court denied the motions. The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the lower court decision, agreeing with both the dismissal and denial of motions.

In a 7-2 opinion written by Chief Justice Roberts, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Trinity Lutheran. David Cortman of the Alliance Defending Freedom discussed the decision and its significance.

Featuring: 

  • David A. Cortman, Lead counsel in Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Pauley, Senior Counsel and Vice President of U.S. Litigation, Alliance Defending Freedom 

Courthouse Steps: Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Inc. v. Comer - Decided

Religious Liberties Practice Group Teleforum
David A. Cortman June 26, 2017

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources (DNR) denied a Learning Center run by Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia, Inc. (Trinity) federal funding to refurbish children’s playgrounds on the grounds of religious affiliation. The DNR offers Playground Scrap Tire Surface Material Grants to organizations that qualify for resurfacing of playgrounds. Though the licensed pre- school Learning Center incorporates religious instruction into is curriculum, the school is open to all children. Trinity’s Learning Center was denied funding based on Article I, Section 7 of the Missouri Constitution; the section reads: “no money shall ever be taken from the public treasury, directly or indirectly, in aid of any church, section or denomination of religion.”

Trinity claimed that the DNR infringed upon their rights under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment and the First Amendment’s protections of freedom of religion and speech. The district court dismissed Trinity’s allegations, claiming that Trinity failed to file a specific claim. Trinity responded by amending its complaint to an allegation that other religious institutions had previously received the DNR funding; nevertheless, the district court denied the motions. The Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the lower court decision, agreeing with both the dismissal and denial of motions.

In a 7-2 opinion written by Chief Justice Roberts, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of Trinity Lutheran. Here to discuss the decision and its significance is David Cortman of the Alliance Defending Freedom.

Featuring: 

  • David A. Cortman, Lead counsel in Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Pauley, Senior Counsel and Vice President of U.S. Litigation, Alliance Defending Freedom 

Courthouse Steps: Advocate Health Care v. Stapleton Decided - Podcast

Religious Liberties Practice Group Teleforum
Eric Baxter June 07, 2017

Advocate Health Care v. Stapleton is a combination of three cases, Advocate Health Care v. Stapleton, St. Peter’s Healthcare v. Kaplan, and Dignity Health v. Rollins, that confront the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) as it applies to churches and non-church religious non-profits. ERISA sets minimum standards for pension plans in private industry, such as an appeals process for participants and the right to sue for benefits. Churches are exempted from ERISA, however, the circuit courts have split over whether non-profit hospitals and schools are also exempted. Eric Baxter of the Becket Fund joined us again to discuss the 8-0 decision issued by the Supreme Court on June 5.

Featuring:

  • Eric Baxter, Senior Counsel, The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

Courthouse Steps: Advocate Health Care v. Stapleton Decided

Religious Liberties Practice Group Teleforum
Eric Baxter June 06, 2017

Advocate Health Care v. Stapleton is a combination of three cases, Advocate Health Care v. Stapleton, St. Peter’s Healthcare v. Kaplan, and Dignity Health v. Rollins, that confront the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA) as it applies to churches and non-church religious non-profits. ERISA sets minimum standards for pension plans in private industry, such as an appeals process for participants and the right to sue for benefits. Churches are exempted from ERISA, however, the circuit courts have split over whether non-profit hospitals and schools are also exempted. Eric Baxter of the Becket Fund will join us again to discuss the 8-0 decision issued by the Supreme Court on June 5.

Featuring:

  • Eric Baxter, Senior Counsel, The Becket Fund for Religious Liberty

Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College - Podcast

Religious Liberties Practice Group Podcast
Kenneth A. Klukowski, Anthony Michael Kreis June 02, 2017

On April 4, 2017, the Seventh Circuit handed down a divided en banc opinion in Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College, opening a circuit split on how to interpret Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which prohibits employment discrimination based on "race, color, religion, sex, or national origin[.]" In Hively, the Seventh Circuit became the first Court of Appeals to hold that sex discrimination encompasses discrimination based on sexual orientation. It held that plaintiff Kimberly Hively could pursue a claim against her former employer, Ivy Tech Community College, for her firing, which she claimed was motivated by her sexual orientation. In doing so, the court opened a split with the Eleventh Circuit, which had held just a few months earlier that employer decisions based on sexual orientation were not discrimination prohibited by Title VII. In addition to paving the way for a potential Supreme Court case to resolve the issue, the Seventh Circuit's decision includes an array of opinions demonstrating different methods of statutory interpretation.

Featuring:

  • Kenneth A. Klukowski, General Counsel, American Civil Rights Union
  • Prof. Anthony Michael Kreis, Visiting Assistant Professor of Law, Chicago-Kent College of Law